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About 

the Built 

Environment 



Selected National 

Grants Endowment 

for the Arts 

Design 
Arts 

Program 



Additional copies of this booklet 
or further information on these 
grants can be obtained from: 



Partners for Livable Places 
2120 P Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20037 
202/223-5867 

or 

Design Arts Program 

National Endowment for the Arts 

2401 E Street, NW 

Washington, DC 20506 

202/634-4276 



Learning 
About 
the Built 
Environment 



Selected National 

Grants Endowment 

for the Arts 

Design 

Arts 

Program 



Edited by 
Roberta Faul 



Published by Partners for Livable Places 
with support by the Design Arts Program, 
National Endowment for the Arts. 



Contents 



Introduction s 



Design Awareness in the Community 

General programs 7 

Audio/Visual: TV, films, videotapes 14 

Exhibitions 28 

Seminars and Workshops 30 

Publications and Educational Materials 39 

Multi-media Projects 53 



Design Awareness in the Schools 

Programs for Teachers 59 

Elementary and Secondary Education 61 

Postsecondary Education 66 



Index 67 



Introduction 



The National Endowment for the Arts, an independent 
agency of the federal government, was established in 
1965 to encourage and assist the nation's cultural 
resources. The Endowment's goals are to make the 
arts more widely available, to preserve the nation's 
cultural heritage, to strengthen its cultural organi- 
zations and to encourage its creative talents. 

Design Arts, one of the Endowment's twelve program 
areas, pursues these goals in the design fields through 
both grant making activities and special advocacy pro- 
jects.* In its fourteen-year history, (1966-1980), 
the program has made available more than $26 million 
for a broad range of activities in the design arts — 
planning and design projects in communities of all 
sizes; professional education and development for 
practitioners of the design arts; research on design 
issues; and "awareness" projects in schools and com- 
munities. 

In addition to grant making, the program conducts 
a Design Excellence Project in order to encourage both 
citizens and the government to recognize the role of 
good design in making our environment more beautiful, 
more efficient and less costly. 

In 1977 Design Arts published a ten-year report 
(By Design) containing a history of its activities. 
Ah outgrowth of this report has been a series of 
smaller booklets on such topics as downtown revitali- 
zation, adaptive use and neighborhood conservation. 
The booklets constitute a series entitled "Selected 
Grants", each with a theme and descriptions of a sam- 
pling of people and projects assisted by the Design 
Arts Program, and are intended to suggest useful de- 
velopments and trends in the design field, and to pro- 
vide readers with sources for further information. 

"Learning about the Built Environment" is a com- 
pilation of the program's support to communities, 
schools and individuals for projects in the areas of 
public education and design awareness. From books, 
exhibitions, films, community workshops, training 
programs and school activities, our grantees have 
been working to build awareness of the issues relat- 
ing to the built environment and to gain public sup- 
port for specific programs of neighborhood conserva- 
tion and downtown revitalization. As the listings in 
this booklet indicate, there are many ways in which 
public support can be won for good planning and design. 
It is our hope that "Learning about the Built Envir- 
onment" and the other booklets in this series will 
provide you with the opportunity to learn useful lessons 
from the experiences of our grantees. 



Michael John Pittas 

Director 

Design Arts Program 



*The Design Arts Program, formerly titled Architecture, 
Planning & Design, represents the fields of architec- 
ture, landscape architecture, urban design and planning, 
interior design, industrial design, fashion and graphic 
design. 



6 



Design Awareness 
in the Community 



General programs 



A program of ghetto design training — enqaqinq architec- 
tural students in assistance for low-income communities 
"to arrive at a satisfactory relationship with their 
physical environment and to evaluate that experience," 
and training local residents in environmental planning 
and design skills — was funded. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Department of Architecture 

77 Massachusetts Avenue 

Cambridge, MA 02139 

Contact: Professors William Porter and John R. Myer, 

617/253-7791 
$30,000 / FY 1969 

Development of a community design center--in space set 
aside in a community building to serve as "a technical 
housing, planning, and design center" — was supported. 
The Mill Creek Architects Workshop set up under the 
grant has made urban renewal plans for the ghetto area, 
organized drafting courses and a career workshop on 
architecture, and organized a "Graffiti Alternatives 
Workshop." Results were presented in a booklet, "We 
Want To Do It For Ourselves." 

Philadelphia Architects Charitable Trust 
Architects Building, 117 South 17th Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19103 
Contact: Augustus Baxter, Executive Vice President, 

Architects Workshop, 401 North Broad Street, 

Philadelphia, PA 19108, 215/574-9591 
$10,000 / FY 1971 

A project to promote the arts in a new urban center in 
Jamaica, Queens, New York City, included hiring a full- 
time arts planner to urge placing of art in public 
spaces. The planner also held an exhibit of Queens 
artists, and made an architectural survey of Queens 
County. 

Queens Council on the Arts 

218-14 Jamaica Avenue 

Queens Village, NY 11428 

Contact: F. Carlisle Towery, Executive Director, 
Greater Jamaica Development Corporation, 161-10 
Jamaica Avenue, Jamaica, NY 11432, 212/291-0282 

$10,000 / FY 1972 

Walker Art Center's programs in architecture and design 
were broadened under this grant. Project included 
development of young critics and architectural writers 
by essays commissioned for the De sign Quarterly , a 
traveling exhibition of innovative learning environments, 
enlargement of Design Quarterly readership, and a two- 
day conference. 

Walker Art Center, Inc. 

Vineland Place 

Minneapolis, MN 55403 

Contact: Martin Friedman, Director, 612/377-7500 

<=:?;>, 500 / FY 1972 



8 



Continuing support of a program to build public awareness 
of architecture and the quality of the built environment 
by the New York State Council was funded. 

New York State Council on Architecture 

810 Seventh Avenue 

New York, NY 10019 

Contact: Barbara Jo Schnepp, 212/765-7630 

$40,000 / FY 1973 

A program to create interest and support for architec- 
tural preservation in Ohio communities was advanced by 
the employment of a roving architect-historian-environ- 
mentalist. This project was in cooperation with the 
Ohio Historical Society. 

Ohio Arts Council 

50 West Broad Street, Suite 2840 

Columbus, OH 43215 

Contact: Gale Brooks, Environmental Preservation, 

Mercantile Library Building, 414 Walnut Street, 

Cincinnati, OH 45202, 513/721-8898 
$5,000 / FY 1973 

Continued support of promotion of art in a new urban 
center in Jamaica, Queens, New York, was funded. 

Queens Council on the Arts 

218-14 Jamaica Avenue 

Queens Village, NY 11428 

Contact: F. Carlisle Towery, Executive Director, Greater 
Jamaica Development Corporation, 161-10 Jamaica 
Avenue, Jamaica, NY 11432, 212/291-0282 

$20,000 / FY 1973 

A variety of New York State Council on Architecture 
programs were continued — after the dissolution of that 
agency by the state legislature — by the State Arts 
Council. Included were a community-leader's workbook, 
two statewide conferences on preservation and community 
action, a program of visiting architect-consultants to 
community planning groups, and a conference for the 
staffs of the state's ten Community Design Councils. 

New York State Council on Architecture 

810 Seventh Avenue 

New York, NY 10019 

Contact: Suzanne Fogelson, Program Associate, New 

York State Council on the Arts, 250 West 57th Street, 

New York, NY 10019, 212/397-1700 
$30,000 / FY 1974 

Expansion to full-time of a roving architectural 
historian-preservationist was funded. A part-time 
program "did much to make the general public aware 
of the continual need for preservation. . .," and 
a full-time program was planned to enlarge cooperation 
with local preservation groups and art councils, work 
with universities, answer crisis calls from communities 
as needed, and produce a publication or map of Ohio's 
leading landmarks and sites of particular significance. 



9 



Ohio Arts Council 

50 West Broad Street, Suite 2840 

Columbus, OH 43215 

Contact: Gale Brooks, Environmental Preservation, 

Mercantile Library Building, 414 Walnut Street, 

Cincinnati, OH 45202, 513/721-8898 
$8,500 / FY 1974 

A program in Washington, Louisiana, to increase local 
public awareness of its architectural and environmental 
heritage, and to present alternative directions for 
future development was funded under this grant. 

Henry V. Stout 
114 Westchester Drive 
Lafayette, LA 70501 
$7,000 / FY 1974 

Continuation of the Trenton Design Center relating to 
local environmental problems, and an environmental 
planning program — involving students in formulation 
of a prototype proposal for urban areas under guidelines 
of the American Institute of Architect's National Growth 
Policy — was funded. An area was selected, and both 
students and local professionals and planning officials 
formulated a plan working with neighborhood residents. 

Community Design and Research Corporation 

440 East State Street 

Trenton, NJ 08608 

Contact: Sandra V. Moore, Executive Director, 

609/393-3344 
$30,000 / FY 1974 



An affirmative educational program in preservation in 
New York City hoped to reach a broad group in support 
of the city's Landmarks Preservation Commission, which 
has now designated over 400 buildings and 24 historic 
districts containing 8,900 additional buildings. The 
grantee pointed out that "this number of landmarks 
cannot depend solely on municipal monitoring. . .or on 
an informed few for leadership in preservation." 
Printed and film materials were used. 

Cultural Council Foundation 

1500 Broadway, 16th Floor 

New York, NY 10036 

Contact: Beverly Moss Spatt, Chairperson, Landmarks 

Preservation Fund, 212/566-7577 
$19,000 / FY 1975 

A "curator" for cultural-environmental activities in 
downtown Brooklyn, New York, was partially supported 
under this grant. "The revitalized area has attracted 
active people," and the "curator" was intended to 
assure that cultural-environmental concerns continued 
to be an intrinsic part of the redevelopment process. 

Downtown Brooklyn Development Association, Inc. 

26 Court Street 

Brooklyn, NY 11242 

Contact: Margot Wellington, Vice President, 212/522-7200 

$18,000 / FY 1975 



10 



Two "Celebrations in City Places" for Little Rock and 
Tulsa were "specifically designed to highlight and re- 
vitalize the urban centers of these cities by celebrating 
the resources which exist there. . .and expand the poten- 
tial for community life. . ." The grantee group included 
local artists and performance groups in addition to the 
traveling Celebrations Group artists, and after a week's 
residency, the full-day program was climaxed by an 
evening performance in an environmental setting. 

Elaine Summers Experimental Intermedia Foundation, Inc. 

537 Broadway 

New York, NY 10012 

Contact: Marilyn Wood, Marilyn Wood and the Celebrations 

Group, 100 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10003, 

212/477-3122 
$10,000 / FY 1975 

A coalition of various environmental groups — into a 
single Center for the Visual Environment — was proposed. 
Friends of the Earth; Sierra Club; National Tenants 
Organization; Don't Tear It Down; National Recreation 
and Park Association; Environmental Action Foundation; 
Oil, Chemical and Atomic Workers; and the American 
Society of Landscape Architects planned that the Center 
provide how-to information for all groups, and generate 
local coalitions. 

Environmental Action Foundation, Inc. 

1346 Connecticut Avenue, NW 

Washington, DC 20036 

Contact: Nancy Carson Shirk, Center for the Visual 

Environment, 1785 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, 

Washington, DC 20036, 202/797-1403 
$17,500 / FY 1975 

To encourage local action and decision-making within 
communities, the grantee encouraged residents of several 
older neighborhoods in Allegheny County to study their 
area's values, conduct inventories, record good features, 
perhaps develop architectural tours, and establish 
programs to conserve neighborhood values. Emphasis was 
on encouraging young people to rebuild and revitalize 
the neighborhoods . 

Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation 

One Landmarks Square 

Pittsburgh, PA 19103 

Contact:" Arthur P. Ziegler, Jr., President, 412/322-1204 

$29,336 / FY 1975 

The Cleveland Restoration Festival was supported by 
this grant. Intended to dramatize economic and cultural 
benefits of improved urban environments, the Festival 
was to include audio-visual presentations and displays 
in schools, libraries, and other public spaces; tours; 
block parties; and the opening of a store-front Community 
Design Center. 

Cleveland Area Arts Council 

140 The Arcade 

Cleveland, OH 44114 

Contact: Nina Gibans, 216/781-0045 

$5,000 / FY 1976 



11 



The establishment of programs to promote the preservation 
of Connecticut's architectural heritage was funded. 
Activities were to include support and stimulation of 
the work of local organizations, citizen participation 
programs, and financial implementation strategies. 

The Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, Inc. 

DeKoven House, 27 Washington Street 

Middle town, CT 064 57 

Contact: Henry Miller, Chairman, 203/436-8228 

$20,000 / FY 1976 

Participation in the Architectural Heritage Year con- 
ference in Amsterdam, October 197 5, was supported. The 
grantee was to be the official American representative 
to this international forum on conservation/preservation 
at the invitation of the Council of Europe. 

League of Cities — Conference of Mayors 

1620 Eye Street, NW 

Washington, DC 20006 

Contact: William Davis, Director, Office of Policy 

Analysis and Development, 202/293-7595 
$17,000 / FY 1976 

Creation of a series of banners — using images drawn by 
school children and celebrating the community's involve- 
ment in the building of the new Jacksonville Police 
Memorial Building — was funded. 

Arts Assembly of Jacksonville, Inc. 

630 May Street 

Jacksonville, FL 32204 

Contact: William Morgan, William Morgan Architects, 

904/356-4195 
$3,000 / FY 1977 

Development of a public information and exhibition 
center — dealing with current design/planning/historic 
preservation proposals and issues in the City of New 
York — was investigated in planning, economic, and 
feasibility studies. Project was to include a review 
of available buildings in mid-town Manhattan that 
could be used to house the center. 

Municipal Art Society 

457 Madison Avenue 

New York, NY 10022 

Contact: Bronson Binger, Vice President, 212/935-3960 

$12,500 / FY 1977 

A nationwide Neighborhood Revitalization Clearinghouse 
aimed at informing local economic development officials 
of current programs, policy and techniques relating to 
the conservation of older neighborhoods was supported 
by this grant. 

The National Council for Urban Economic Development 

1620 Eye Street, NW - Suite 600 

Washington, DC 20006 

Contact: Kenneth Dobson, Director, Technical Assistance 

Services, 202/223-4735 
$17,000 / FY 1977 



18 



Establishment of a national neighborhood clearinghouse 
and expanded advisory services in the neighborhood 
conservation field were funded. The program was to 
include added staff expertise, information resources, 
a newsletter, special publications, and on-site technical 
assistance in target communities. 

The National Trust for Historic Preservation 

1785 Massachusetts Avenue, NW 

Washington, DC 20036 

Contact: Henry McCartney, Conserve Neighborhoods, 

202/673-4100 
$37,070 / FY 1977 

A coordinated graphic design system for the new Univer- 
sity of the District of Columbia was developed. Grantee 
proposed to prepare and implement a total design strategy 
for all graphic materials, including letterhead, brochures, 
campus locators, signs and the like. 

University of the District of Columbia 

Office of Institutional Advancement 

4200 Connecticut Avenue, NW 

Washington, DC 20008 

Contact: Charles I. Cassell, Project Director, 

202/282-7509 
$17,500 / FY 1977 

Development of an Architects-in-Communities program-- 
to place architects and landscape architects in resi- 
dencies in community institutions — was assisted by 
this grant. Grantee formulated program concepts, 
guidelines for funding of applicants and a pilot pro- 
gram. 

Educational Futures, Inc. 

2118 Spruce Street 

Philadelphia, PA 19103 

Contact: Dr. Aase Eriksen, Director, 215/735-2118 

$15,810 / FY 1978 

A theater tour of a courtroom drama, The Night of 
January 16 , was funded to tour communities in Illinois 
having an historic courthouse. The project was in- 
tended to increase citizen awareness of and interest 
in courthouse renovation projects. 

Illinois Arts Council 

111 North Wabash, Room 720 

Chicago, IL 60602 

Contact: Robert Betts, Director, Art Services, 

312/435-6750 
$5,115 / FY 1978 

Extensive research, a livability charrette in Frederick, 
Maryland, seminars and issues papers were among the 
activities conducted by the Partners for Livable Places 
to identify various aspects of livability, including 
use of the design arts to enhance the quality of life 
in both small and large cities. Grantee intended to 
produce a publication in the future that "test markets" 
the many facets of livability identified through its 
research activities. 

Partners for Livable Places 

2120 P Street, NW 

Washington, DC 20037 

Contact: Robert McNulty, President, 202/223-5867 

$150,000 / FY 1978 



13 



Beautification of Cleveland's rapid transit right-of-way 
was to be initiated through an environmental education 
project involving community groups, students, and local 
design professionals. Assistance was for development of 
a slide show on the clean-up program, preparation of 
materials for use in the classroom, and support of 
artists and landscape architects who would work in the 
classroom with students on specific improvement efforts. 

Rapid Recovery, Inc. 
1404 East 9th Street 
Cleveland, OH 44114 
Contact: Holly Birrer, Assistant Director, 216/781-5100, 

ext. 486 
$10,000 / FY 1978 

An information center for preservation planning was to 
be established — to gather, evaluate, and disseminate 
information on historic neighborhood preservation 
projects in the United States. Grantee identified a 
range of groups that could benefit from the center's 
activities: government agencies, planning and design 
professionals, community groups, preservationists, and 
others . 

The Trustees of Columbia University 
New York, NY 10027 

Contact: Jacques Dalibard, 212/280-3518 
$15,000 / FY 1978 

A statewide architecture awareness process was developed, 
utilizing visual information materials, regional work- 
shops, citizen participation, and distribution of printed 
materials. Project was intended to stimulate design 
awareness of state and local government officials; help 
Vermonters make informed choices in dealing with issues 
on the natural and built environment; and create an 
information-and-action network of organizations concerned 
with planning, architecture, and design. 

Vermont Council on the Arts, Inc. 

136 State Street 

Montpelier, VT 05602 

Contact: Ellen McCulloch-Lovell , Executive Director, 

802/828-3291 
$14,000 / FY 1978 



Audio/Visual: TV, films, videotapes 



A 'grass roots' program of environmental awareness 
at the local level was generated by this grant. Its 
goals: "To concentrate on visual aspects of environ- 
ment, translate national issues into local context, 
combat public apathy, and stress the necessity of 
semi-urban and rural planning." After initial re- 
search, a film of existing environmental conditions 
was made, supplemented by a slide presentation of 
possible improvements. 

Auburn University 

School of Architecture and Fine Arts 
Auburn, AL 36830 

Contact: Steffen Doerstling, Professor of Archi- 
tecture, 205/826-4516 
$10,000 / FY 1972 

A multi-media, multi-level protrait of an American 
town, "Muncie" was a pilot project of a method in 
which many American towns could "look at themselves" 
as a part of the growing awareness of environmental 
concerns. The presentation—combining 16mm movies, 
35mm slides and multi-channel sterophonic sound — 
related the parts of town to geographical or his- 
toric counterparts, and aspects of the environment 
which normally remain hidden or forgotten. 

Ball State University 

College of Architecture and Planning 

Muncie, IN 47306 

Contact: John Durtich, Associate Professor and 

Visiting Lecturer in Architecture, 317/285-4548 
$13,435 / FY 1972 

Two films on the preservation and reuse of his- 
toric railroad stations were completed. One explored 
at length the creative reuse of railroad stations. 
The other, a shortened version, was premiered at a 
national conference on railroad station reuse in 
1974. Both have been shown around the country. 

Roger T. Hagan 

1019 Belmont Place East 

Seattle, WA 98102 

$20,313 and $5,000 / FY 1972 and 1974 

A series of films on the future of housing in Amer- 
ica were researched and developed, showing "the 
relationship between man and his shelter and en- 
couraging a new awareness and dynamism in that 
relationship at the community level." Treatments 
were written for four films. 

New York State Council on Architecture 

810 Seventh Avenue 

New York, NY 10019 

Contact: Peggy Sloane, 212/288-0979 

$9,989 / FY 1972 



18 



A film to educate television viewers to qualities of 
good design; and how design — good and bad — influences 
most elements of their lives; was funded. The pilot 
film, "Who Built This Place?" received an award of merit 
in the Columbia University architecture film festival. 

Public Television Foundation for North Texas 

3000 Harry Hines Boulevard 

Dallas, TX 75201 

Contact: Sam Hudson, Producer/Director, 4318 Emerson 

Avenue, Dallas, TX 75205, 214/522-5755 
$15,000 / FY 1972 

A full-length documentary film on the city environment — 
viewed as a functioning and changing organism — was 
partially supported through this grant. 

Hilary T. Harris 
49-A Eighth Avenue 
New York, NY 10014 
$10,000 / FY 1973 

A photographic essay of San Francisco — "A Planner Looks 
at His City" — included in large photos cityscape, 
setting, topography, climate, views, people, housing, 
commerce. . .intended to dramatize what many planners 
and other urbanists are concerned with preserving. The 
project was planned for museum and institutional display 
and opened at the DeYoung Museum in San Francisco. 

Allan B. Jacobs 

200 Beacon Street 

San Francisco, CA 94131 

$10,000 / FY 1973 

Development of a color slide film — "Working Places"-- 
was funded to encourage the preservation/reuse of 
significant industrial sites, objects, and structures 
in the hope of promoting their retention and reuse. 

Society for Industrial Archeology 

Room 5020, National Museum of History and Technology 
Smithsonian Institution 
Washington, DC 20560 

Contact: Chester Liebs, Department of History, Univer- 
sity of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05401, 802/656-3180 
$9,000 / FY 1973 

A 30-minute film, "Measure of Change," describing 
the history of Newburyport, Massachusetts, was 
made — emphasizing the historic town's topographic 
history, its streetscape and some possible methods 
of reuse of older buildings. 

Vision, Inc. 

Suite 601, 678 Massachusetts Avenue 

Cambridge, MA 

Contact: Joyce Mechan, Director 

617/491-3763 
$28,940 / FY 1973 



16 



Planning and development of a design bicentennial — 
"commemorating the past, examining the present, and 
probing the future" of all design disciplines, 
including architecture, landscape architecture, 
planning, engineering, interior design, industrial 
design, graphics, costuming, and packaging — were 
funded. In a second phase, actual exhibits, slide 
shows, publications, and the like were to be prepared. 
The goal: public design awareness. 

American Design Bicentennial, Inc. 

2215 Observatory Place, NW 

Washington, DC 20007 

Contact: Paul D. Spreiregen, Director, 202/337-2887 

$40,000 / FY 1974 

Twenty half -hour radio shows on critical issues of 
New York City planning were developed to stimulate 
citizen interest and participation in groups seeking 
to improve the quality of urban life. They were 
broadcast on a Harlem station and stimulated such 
interest that the programming — entitled "A Train" 
— continued beyond the twenty shows. 

James M. Bond, Jr. 
434 West 162nd Street 
New York, NY 10032 
$10,000 / FY 1974 

A film on patterns of urban development — "the dynamic 
patterns of urban space in two San Francisco Bay 
Area neighborhoods" — was funded. 

California Historical Society Trust 

2090 Jackson Street 

San Francisco, CA 94109 

Contact: Victor Rosenberg or Frederick Sweet, 

415/548-5070 
$15,000 / FY 1974 

A dramatization of the variety and quality of the 
visual environment along Boston's Metropolitan 
Transit Autnority routes was done for residents 
and visitors by a series of short film scenarios 
consisting of one thousand color slides shown in 
three minutes "to create visual impressions" 
reinforced by sound cues. 

Ralph W. Clamplitt 
3 Pirates Land 
Gloucester, MA 01930 
$10,000 / FY 1974 

A film to introduce pre-school children to the 
urban environment, its basic concepts and problems, 
was created. The film used 250 tempera paintings 
and a sound track of impressionistic music, in the 
form of a story about an idyllic environment 
deteriorating with the influx of a large population 
and oppressive urban structures. 

Virgil E. Ford, Jr. 
1150 Boyd Avenue, #H-1 
Baton Rouge, LA 70802 
$250 / FY 1974 



17 



A film program to foster public discussion of a 
controversial airport in the Hudson River Valley 
was funded. The film publicized the thoughts of 
planners, architects, government officials and 
others on a proposal to expand Stewart Airport 
into a major jetport for the New York City metro- 
politan region. Showing of the film on public- 
access television and in extensive private 
screenings was planned. 

Greater Cornwall Association, Inc. 

c/o Hudson River Valley Council 

108 Dubois Street 

Newburgh, NY 12550 

Contact: Gerald S. Pallor, English Department, 

State University of New York, New Paltz, NY 

12561, 914/257-4253 
$24,661 / FY 1974 

The problems of an ethnic community to preserve its 
character and identify within the context of urban 
renewal were studied. A 30-minute film entitled 
"Save Chinatown" documented the impact on Philadel- 
phia's Chinatown of two major projects—the Vine 
Street Expressway and the Market Street East com- 
mercial development. Emphasis was on the nature 
and scope of community participation possible in 
the design process. 

Jon Wing Lum 
341 East 5th Street 
New York, NY 10003 
$9,600 / FY 1974 

The pilot film of a proposed television series on 
urban issues was prepared. It explored the housing 
choices available in the area, and outlined the 
decisions — obvious and hidden — that individuals make 
in the selection of a house, and how those decisions 
affect their life styles. It is proposed that the 
30-minute films be available to interested groups 
and organizations after they are aired on Dallas' 
Channel 13. 

Public Communications Foundation for North Texas 

3000 Harry Hines Boulevard 

Dallas, TX 75201 

Contact: Allen Cullum, Coordinating Producer, 

214/744-1300 
$15,542 / FY 1974 

Mechanical systems as a determinant in the evolu- 
tion of architectural form was the subject of a 
thirty-minute film funded under this grant. This 
was the second in a series of films on architecture 
and urban planning directed by Samuel Hudson. 

South Central Educational Broadcasting Council 

P.O. Box Z 

Hershey, PA 17033 

Contact: Sam Hudson, 4 318 Emerson Avenue, Dallas, 

TX 75205, 214/522-5755 
$30,000 / FY 1974 



18 



A color film entitled "New York City — Working Model" 
shows the interrelationships of the primary systems 
"that pattern the lives and define the activities 
of city dwellers." "Systems" considered included 
air, rail, and sea; public and private vehicles; 
communications; food and water supply; and waste 
disposal. The film was intended for both professional 
and broad audiences; and release on public television 
was hoped for . 

The Trustees of Columbia University 

Box 6 

Low Library 

New York, NY 10027 

Contact: James Stewart Polshek, Dean, Graduate 

School of Architecture and Planning, 212/280-3504 
$15,000 / FY 1974 

A 20-minute color/sound film on conservation of the 
built environment was intended "to highlight a grow- 
ing coalition between groups and individuals con- 
cerned with historic preservation and those concerned 
with the natural environment, to underscore the com- 
mon interest. . . ; " to focus on imaginative case 
histories; and to show that economic growth and de- 
velopment can be accomplished through conservation 
and rehabilitation as well as through new construction 
and large scale renewal. 

The Conservation Foundation 

1717 Massachusetts Avenue, NW 

Washington, DC 20036 

Contact: Gordon Binder, Assistant to the President, 

202/797-4300 
$50,000 / FY 1975 

An environmental awareness program for Hawaii — 
focusing on reducing present polarizations by 
stressing the "how" rather than the "whether" 
of development — reached the public through films 
and educational materials, studies of Hawaii's 
existing land use and environmental laws and policies 
and education programs to schools and citizen 
groups. The hope was that "citizen groups would 
maintain cooperative relations with planning 
authorities and work towards higher quality design 
solutions. " 

Hawaii State Foundation on Culture and the Arts 

250 South King Street 

Honolulu, HI 96813 

Contact: Frank S. Haines, FAIA, 808/548-4145 

$20,000 / FY 1975 

Increasing public awareness of the heritage and 
possible future development of North Adams, 
Massachusetts, was the intent of this project. 
Utilizing the "Foxfire" approach, the town's resi- 
dents were interviewed and photography and film were 
employed in an effort to reawaken the townspeople 
to the importance of their involvement in the 
development of the community and the solution of 
community problems. 

Hoosuck Community Resources Corporation 

121 Union Street 

North Adams, MA 02147 

Contact: Edward C. Carman, Jr., Corporation 

Manager, 413/664-6382 
$20,000 / FY 1975 



19 



Tape cassette stations in the Minnesota Pioneer 
Travel Park at various historic buildings and 
sites pointed out the important and historic 
features of the area. Stations included Annandale 
Railroad Depot, an 1870 log house, blacksmith shop, 
1886 church, 1890 schoolhouse, and a nature trail. 
Material was supplied by the Wright County His- 
torical Society. 

Minnesota Pioneer Travel Park 
Annandale, MN 55302 

Contact: Nobel Shadduck, 612/274-5277 
$3,000 / FY 1975 

The conversion of a slide presentation, "The 
Civilized City," to a film was funded. The theme 
of the presentation was "that city and civilization 
are synonymous, that there is no substitute for the 
city as a cultural force, and that most of the 
elements which enhance the quality of urban life 
already exist. " The film was intended to reach 
public as well as professional audiences. 

George Nelson 
George Nelson and Company 
251 Park Avenue South 
New York, NY 10010 
$12,000 / FY 1975 

Three 30-second 16mm film spots on accessibility 
of the arts to the handicapped were prepared for 
television broadcast, in an attempt to heighten 
public awareness of the ongoing effort to create 
barrier-free architecture. The contractor was 
responsible for all pre-production, filming and 
production, approvals, and effective distribution 
of the films with emphasis on maximum free public 
service placement across the country. 

Public Interest Advertising Council 

1516 Westwood Boulevard 

Suite 201 

Los Angeles, CA 90024 

Contact: Marvin T. Segelman, Executive Director, 

213/475-5781 
$35,000 / FY 1975 

Continuation of a program on reducing physical barriers 
to the handicapped was funded. This grant was for 
editing and processing of video tapes for national 
distribution by the National Public Broadcasting System 
as spots and programs, and for preparation of a book on 
the conclusions of the study conducted under an earlier 
grant. 

Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago 

345 East Superior 

Chicago, IL 60611 

Contact: Bertram Berenson, Dean Designate, College of 
Design, Architecture and Art, University of Cincin- 
nati, Cincinnati, OH 45221, 714/295-4629 

$6,000 / FY 1975 



80 



A film and video tape festival focusing on small towns 
and suburbs throughout the world was funded. Emphasis 
was on urban planning, design, and architecture—a 
format modifying and concentrating on some of the areas 
explored in a 1973 film festival. A catalog was to 
list festival films and other appropriate films for 
professional and public reference. Public television 
channels expressed interest. 

The Trustees of Columbia University 

Box 6 , Low Library 

New York, NY 10027 

Contact: James Stewart Polshek, Graduate School of 

Architecture and Planning, 212/280-3504 
$10,000 / FY 1975 

A documentary on H. H. Richardson's train station in 
New London, Connecticut, was funded. The 30-minute 
slide and tape show was to record the history, decline, 
and restoration of the station and was intended as an 
educational tool for communities involved in adaptive 
reuse projects. 

Todd A. Gipstein 
19 Pinckney Street 
Boston, MA 02114 
$10,000 / FY 1976 

The preparation of a traveling multi-media exhibit, 
"Main Street," was supported by this grant. The exhibit 
was to be designed to encourage small Indiana towns to 
work for physical and visual improvements in their 
commercial sections, and was to demonstrate ways in 
which this might be accomplished. The topics were to 
include analysis of the townscape, cost estimating on 
facade improvement, color spectrum for painting various 
styles of buildings, and model block restoration. 

Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana, Inc. 

3402 Boulevard Place 

Indianapolis, IN 46208 

Contact: Christopher Owens, Director of Property and 

Planning, 317/926-2301 
$6,150 / FY 1976 

The use of the Environmental Impact Statement as a com- 
munity tool was to be the subject of a 2 0-minute 
public affairs film. "The film was intended to serve 
as a definitive primer for community groups in order 
that they may participate meaningfully in the prepara- 
tion of the Environmental Impact Statement." 

Jon Wing Lum 
341 East 5th Street 
New York, NY 10003 
$9,800 / FY 1976 



21 



CINE CITY, a center city urban communications film 
festival in Philadelphia, was supported under this 
grant. The festival, held in conjunction with the 
1976 National American Institute of Architects 
Convention, was to feature films to be shown in 
public movie theatres during daytime hours. Cate- 
gories were to include technological and historical 
films, documentaries of cities, aerial and NASA 
space footage, student films, and others. 

Philadelphia Architects Charitable Trust 

The Architects Building 

117 South 17th Street 

Philadelphia, PA 19103 

Contact: Richard Saul Wurman, Murphy, Levy, Wurman, 

1214 Arch Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107, 

215/564-4400 
$10,000 / FY 1976 

Detailed photographic documentation of New Orleans' 
central business district was funded by this grant. 
The work was to be used to promote public awareness 
of the important historical and visual value of 
this district which is adjacent to the Vieux Carre. 

David Richmond 
134 Exchange Place 
New Orleans, LA 70130 
$8,200 / FY 1976 

A 16mm film on the reuse of significant industrial 
structures and objects was to be made from slide 
material assembled under a previous grant. The 
great national demand for the slide show made con- 
version to film necessary to achieve maximum dis- 
tribution potential. Copies of the completed film 
were to be distributed nationally by the National 
Trust for Historic Preservation. 

Society for Industrial Archeology 

Room 5050 

National Museum of History and Technology 

Smithsonian Institution 

Washington, DC 20560 

Contact: Chester Liebs, Department of History, 

University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 054 01 

802/656-3180 
$4,984 / FY 1976 

The completion of a documentary film on San Francisco's 
seawall and its historical importance to the heritage 
of the city was funded by this grant. 

Jack W. Stauffacher 
300 Broadway 

San Francisco, CA 94133 
$8,000 / FY 1976 



88 



A slide/video show that presents the problems of vacant 
lots and their impact on Oakland's neighborhoods and 
which offers design alternatives for the redevelopment 
of these properties was funded. 

The Trust for Public Land 

82 Second Street 

San Francisco, CA 94105 

Contact: Steve Costa, 415/495-4014 

$3,400 / FY 1976 

Four films for children on the built environment were 
funded. These films, along with the previously com- 
pleted Abbraconstructa , were to form an educational 
package designed to increase the design awareness of 
elementary school children. 

George H. Van Allen 
132 Cherokee Road 
Charlotte, NC 23207 
$8,854 / FY 1976 

A film on successful school reuse projects was assisted 
by this grant. Emphasis was to be placed on procedural 
and professional requirements for such a reuse, with 
the conversion of a Gloucester, Massachusetts, grammar 
school into an apartment facility serving as an example. 

Albert Viator 
3 Calder Street 
Gloucester, MA 01930 
$8,000 / FY 1976 

A documentary video tape on design implications of 
neighborhoods in China was planned under this grant. 

The Women's Design Center, Inc. 

10 Kirkland Road 

Cambridge, MA 02138 

Contact: Marjorie Hoog, Alliance of Women in Archi- 
tecture, P.O. Box 5136, FDR Station, New York, NY 
10022, 212/724-7224 

$5,640 / FY 1976 

A series of bilingual slide-tape programs were prepared 
to increase resident pride and awareness of Walker's 
Point as a special place to live. The programs were to 
focus on the historic, architectural, and ethnic attrib- 
utes of the area. 

Historic Walker's Point, Inc. 

414 West National Avenue 

Milwaukee, WI 53204 

Contact: Bruce M. Kriviskey, 414/645-9222 

$950 / FY 1977 

A film on Seattle's Pike Place Market was produced for 
television broadcast and distribution to schools and 
community organizations in western Washington. 

Allied Arts Foundation 

107 South Main 

Seattle, WA 98104 

Contact: Alice Rooney, Executive Director, 206/624-0432 

$8,800 / FY 1978 



83 



An audio-visual presentation from the exhibit More 
Streets for People was converted to 16mm film for wider 
distribution to educational and community groups. 

Institute for Environmental Action, Inc. 

81 Leonard Street 

New York, NY 10013 

Contact: Roberto Brambilla, 212/260-6278 

$5,000 / FY 1978 

A film on the Washington Market/Tribeca area in lower 
Manhattan was funded. The one-hour production was to 
combine a historical look at the area with an examina- 
tion of "the role of artists as a dynamic force in the 
growth of neighborhoods . " 

Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Inc. 

15 State Street 

New York, NY 10004 

Contact: Amalie Rothschild, 212/925-1500 

$30,000 / FY 1978 

A project to improve visual/perceptual skills of the 
public was assisted by this grant. Grantee assembled 
instructional "bits" of visual information into modules 
that deal with ways of looking at the built environment, 
products, and the like. Suitable media for packaging 
the modules would include print, films, video tape and 
slides. 

New York Chapter, American Institute of Architects 

Foundation, Inc. 
20 West 40th Street 
New York, NY 10018 

Contact: George Nelson, 212/777-4300 
$28,600 / FY 1978 

A 16mm film of "If You Want to Change Your City" — the 
principal module from the exhibition The Streets of 
Washington — was produced and made available for distri- 
bution through professional societies and the agencies 
which participated in the exhibition. 

Joseph R. Passonneau 
3015 Que Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20007 
$17,500 / FY 1978 

A film on the problems of displacement in neighborhood 
revitalization was researched with this grant. Grantee 
used the work of Savannah Landmark Rehabilitation, Inc., 
as the case study for the film. 

WETV /Atlanta Board of Education 

740 Bismark Road, NE 

Atlanta, GA 30324 

Contact: Albert Scardino, Producer, 912/234-9782 

$29,145 / FY 1978 



84 



Experimental films for teaching design principles to 
children were produced to invite different forms of 
participation in the films by children in the audience 
— e.g. audience animation techniques, becoming an 
"actor" in the film, producing shadow images on the 
screen. Project's objective was to use film "as a 
creative context. . .through which children may become 
aware of the consequences of their decisions by direct 
participation before and during the film. ..." 

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 

201 Cowgill Hall 

Blacksburg, VA 24061 

Contact: John T. Regan, Assistant Dean, 703/951-5383 

$5,000 / FY 1978 



Exhibitions 85 



CITY/2, an exhibit, dramatized the amount of public space 
in Philadelphia and the argument that "the public-owned 
land is the most pervasive, insistent single influence 
on the urban visual experience." (Forty percent of all 
land in the average American city is publicly owned; 
the figure in Philadelphia is fifty-five percent) . The 
goal was a standard for civic environmental performance 
"to define concepts and establish responsibilities for 
the urba visual experience." 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 

P.O. Box 7646 

Philadelphia, PA 19101 

Contact: Richard Saul Wurman, 1214 Arch Street, 

Philadelphia, PA 19107, 215/564-4400 
$10,000 / FY 1970 

An exhibit of John Hejduk's work, at the Le . Corbusier 
Center in Paris, was supported by this grant. Hejduk 
was the first American architect to be invited to ex- 
hibit his work at the Center, and over 100 mounted 
drawings and six models were displayed. After eight 
weeks in Paris, the exhibit circulated throughout Europe. 

John Hejduk 
200 East 37th Street 
New York, NY 10016 
$5,000 / FY 1972 

An exhibition of "life in the year 2020" was developed 
by members of a group interested in the future potential 
of American technology and its impact on design. 

Contemporary Arts Association of Houston 

5216 Montrose Boulevard 

Houston, TX 77006 

Contact: Douglas Michels, P.O. Box 77082, San Francisco, 

CA 94107, 415/788-1424 
$10,000 / FY 1973 

Preparation of a Smithsonian traveling exhibition on 
urban housing, based on material developed under 
earlier grants, was supported. 

Roger Sherwood 

School of Architecture and Fine Arts 

University of Southern California 

University Park 

Los Angeles, CA 90007 

$1,200 / FY 1973 

An exhibit and catalog of the work of women in archi- 
tecture, selected on a national basis for high pro- 
fessional quality, was opened in New York and was 
intended to travel "to give women an identity as archi- 
tects, to encourage female students, and to encourage 
the public to use the services of female professionals.' 

Architectural League of New York 

41 East 65th Street 

New York, NY 10021 

Contact: Susana Torre, 212/247-7238 

$10,000 / FY 1974 



26 



A public awareness program documenting benefits of 
pedestrian districts in an effort to foster the idea 
that "the pedestrian is the paramount user of the city" 
— was funded. Project included a traveling exhibit 
of the most successful pedestrian experiments around 
the world, several publications discussing the issues 
and conflicts involved, and a series of open forums for 
debate. There was emphasis on a study demonstrating 
not just improved environment, but improved economics 
of the city as a result of attitudinal changes. 

Institute for Environmental Action, Inc. 

81 Leonard Street 

New York, NY 10013 

Contact: Roberto Brambilla, 212/966-6390 

$15,000 / FY 1974 

A permanent education exhibit — "Baltimore-Structure 
and Dynamics" — was planned and designed under this 
grant. The exhibit, a feature of the city's Bicen- 
tennial, enhances understanding of the city as a 
physical, social, and dynamic environment as well as 
highlighting the city's 200-year history. 

City of Baltimore 

Office of the Mayor 

230 City Hall 

Baltimore, MD 21202 

Contact: Larry Reich, Director, Department of Plan- 
ning, 222 East Saratoga Street, Baltimore, MD 21202, 
301/396-4327 

$2,371 / FY 1975 

General education programs by the Seattle Office of 
Urban Conservation were funded — including "More 
Streets for People" and other programs directed by 
increasing public awareness of conservation principles. 
Additionally, new conservation projects were instigated. 

City of Seattle 
Municipal Building 
Seattle, WA 98104 

Contact: Arthur M. Skolnik, The Conservation Co., 
1955 6th Ave, W, Seattle, WA 98119, 206/284-8556 
$10,000 / FY 1975 

A touring exhibit of the work of Frank Lloyd Wright was 
developed using six exhibition panels with photographs, 
drawings, and captions. Circulation for the exhibit 
under the sponsorship of the Smithsonian Institution 
was assured, and the United States Information Agency 
planned to adapt the exhibit for cultural centers abroad. 

Edgar Tafel 
74 Fifth Avenue 
New York, NY 10011 
$8,850 / FY 1975 

An exhibition on the streets of Washington, DC, was to 
be produced for display in the Union Station Visitors 
Center. The streets — past, present, and future — were 
to be shown through drawings, photographs, paintings, 
diagrams, artifacts, and an audio/visual show. 

American Institute of Architects Foundation, Inc. 

17 35 New York Avenue, NW 

Washington, DC 20006 

Contact: Jeanne Butler, Administrator, 202/638-3105 

$110,000 / FY 1976 



27 



A major environmental design exhibit and complementary 
program of first-hand observation of the physical 
history and contemporary features of the Fort Point Chan- 
nel District in Boston were funded by this grant. 

The Children's Museum 

The Jamaicaway 

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 

Contact: Jim Zein, Director, Community Services, 

617/522-4800 
$10,000 / FY 1976 

An exhibit documenting the architecture and urban design 
of selected industrial communities in northeastern 
United States was to be prepared and displayed in cities 
around the country. The cities and towns to be chosen 
are those which are particularly significant for the 
social impact of their environmental design and their 
sense of historical continuity. 

Randolph Langenbach 
24 Cambridge Terrace 
Cambridge, MA 02140 
$10,000 / FY 1976 

A visual exhibit depicting the quality, form, and spirit 
of Bennington, Vermont, was funded under this grant. 
The exhibit of photographs, relief maps, and other vis- 
ual techniques was to deal with the downtown area and 
the town's visual atmosphere and activities. 

Park-McCullough House Association, Inc. 

Box 95 

North Bennington, VT 052 57 

Contact: Tordis Ilg Isselhardt, Executive Director, 

802/442-2747 
$6,000 / FY 1976 

A photographic exhibition of architectural development 
in the United States from 1276 to 1976 was funded. The 
material was to be "drawn from G.E. Kidder Smith's 
extensive architectural survey of extant structures in 
the United States," and the exhibit was to be circulated 
through a national tour involving at least forty cultural 
organizations throughout the country. 

Smithsonian Institution 

Arts and Industries Building 

Washington, DC 20560 

Contact: Antonio Diez, Smithsonian Institution 

Traveling Exhibitions Service, 202/381-6631 
$15,000 / FY 1976 

An exhibit on mill buildings in the Great Falls Historic 
District was planned and designed. Interpretive material 
in the exhibit on the social and industrial history of 
Paterson, New Jersey, was intended to stimulate public 
awareness of a program to preserve and reuse the 49 mill 
buildings in Paterson 's historic district. 

City of Paterson 

Department of Community Development 

52 Church Street 

Paterson, NJ 07505 

Contact: Jack Stokvis, Project Manager, Great Falls 

Historic District, 201/684-3000 
$19,750 / FY 1977 



28 



An exhibition of visionary drawings by 20th-century 
architects and planners was organized by the Drawing 
Center, New York City, with this grant assistance. 

The Drawing Center 

137 Greene Street 

New York, NY 10012 

Contact: Martha Beck, Director, 212/982-5266 

$10,000 / FY 1977 

A major exhibition on the history of design of public 
buildings, scheduled for early 1979, was planned under 
this grant. Material for the exhibition would be from 
the National Archives, Library of Congress, and the 
Office of the Architect of the Capitol. 

The Dunlap Society, Inc. 

Room 14 7 

National Collection of Fine Arts 

Smithsonian Institution 

Washington, DC 20560 

Contact. Bates Lowry, President, 518/963-7373 

$13,614 / FY 1977 

An exhibition titled 20th Century Ruins/The Re-Built 
Environment was assisted. Focus of the exhibition was 
the rebuilding of five abandoned rowhouses in New York 
City by five artists "whose work is distinguished by a 
common concern with aesthetic statements through the 
alteration of existing architectural form." 

The Institute for Art and Urban Resources 

The Clocktower 

108 Leonard Street 

New York, NY 10013 

Contact: Linda Blumberg, 212/233-1096 

$20,000 / FY 1977 

An exhibit "What Time Is This Station? (Tomorrow)" — 
dealing with the place and importance of the Dudley 
Street Station in the Roxbury community — received 
funding. 

Museum of Afro-American History 

2276 Washington Street 

Roxbury, MA 02119 

Contact: Alan Bell, Special Projects Director, 

617/440-8319 
$10,000 / FY 1977 

Five commissioned architectural projects — prepared in 
conjunction with the Museum of Modern Art's exhibition, 
Transformations in Modern Architecture — were partially 
financed with this grant. 

The Museum of Modern Art 

11 West 53rd Street 

New York, NY 10019 

Contact: Arthur Drexler, Director, Architecture and 

Design, 212/956-2680 
$15,000 / FY 1977 



29 



Preparation of a display of ideas for home improvements 
in an older, interracial neighborhood received funding 
support. The grant also supported a booklet to supple- 
ment the display and guide appropriate rehabilitation 
in the neighborhood. 

19th Ward Community Association 

541 Thurston Road 

Rochester, NY 14619 

Contact: Mark Beach, 716/328-7909 

$8,700 / FY 1977 

A major touring exhibition The Federal Design Response 
was organized by the American Institute of Graphic Arts 
in cooperation with the Federal Design Council. Intended 
to display examples of "the quality and diversity 
of design solutions recently developed for the Fed- 
eral government," the exhibition toured the United 
States and abroad after opening at the AIGA in New York. 

American Institute of Graphic Arts 

1059 Third Avenue 

New York, NY 10021 

Contact: Richard Lopez, 212/867-7090 

$7,500 / FY 1978 

An exhibition on Radio City Music Hall was organized 
with this grant as an effort to gain support for pre- 
serving the building. Photographic displays focused 
on design elements and furnishings of the lobby, 
auditorium, and ancillary spaces. 

American Society of Interior Designers Educational 
Foundation, Inc. 

730 Fifth Avenue 

New York, NY 10019 

Contact: R. Michael Brown, National Chairman, His- 
toric Preservation Committee, 212/799-1384 

$12,500 / FY 1978 

An exhibition on the architectural heritage of Memphis, 
Tennessee, sponsored by the Brooks Memorial Art Gallery, 
was supported by this grant. 

Brooks Memorial Art Gallery 

Overton Park 

Memphis, TN 38112 

Contact: Dr. John Whitlock, Director, 901/274-5796 

$2,930 / FY 1978 



Seminars and Workshops 



A conference on the impact of the Tocks Island Dam on 
the upper Delaware River was held. The dam was to have 
created a 30-mile lake and a national recreation area, 
the conference on the opportunities for and opposition 
to the project was attended by about seveny-five 
Federal, state, and local leaders and planning officials, 
The conference received extensive press coverage in 
four states. This controversial dam project has since 
been abandoned. 

Tocks Island Regional Advisory Council 

Tymer Building 

40 Park Place 

Newton, NJ 07860 

Contact: Frank W. Dressier, Executive Director, 

717/421-9841 
$10,000 / FY 1967 

A workshop in neighborhood self-improvement of the 
Lower East Side of Manhattan emphasized study and 
self-discovery of ways to improve the urban environ- 
ment. A "Clean Your Community" poster competition for 
elementary students; a program to identity, sketch, or 
photograph "What You Consider Major Environmental 
Problems" for secondary students, and community-level 
planning sessions were held. Hundreds of students 
and community residents became involved in this program. 

Basement Workshop, Inc. 

22 Caterine Street 

New York, NY 10038 

Contact: Chi Wing Ho, 213/889-7870 

$9,700 / FY 1974 

A four-day "design charrette" for the public in Guthrie, 
Oklahoma, was held. Maps and models were prepared in 
advance; and issues including traffic and parking, 
enhancement of historic districts, a schedule for re- 
placing commercial buildings, and greenbelt proposals 
were discussed. Results were published locally for 
broader information and input. 

City of Guthrie 

Chamber of Commerce 

101 North Second Avenue 

Guthrie, OK 73044 

Contact: Donald R. Coffin, President, 405/282-1793 

$20,000 / FY 1974 



31 



A workshop on adapting railroad stations for multiple 
use, held on July 21-23, 1974, in Indianapolis, was 
coordinated and planned. Objectives of the workshop 
were the establishment of guidelines for adaptive use 
of stations, determination of what legislation or 
authority would provide incentives to make adaptive 
use more attractive to all parties concerned, and the 
establishment of a clearinghouse of information on such 
adaptive use. The contract included preparation of pa- 
pers on various legal, economic, and technical problems/ 
solutions/alternatives that might be involved in 
efforts to revitalize railroad stations. The proceedings 
of the workshop formed the basis for a publication 
on use of railroad stations as facilities for the arts. 

Educational Facilities Laboratories, Inc. 

680 5th Avenue 

New York, NY 10018 

Contact: Alan C. Green, President, 

212/397-0037 
$17,000 / FY 1974 

Workshops and training in building of low-cost housing 
appropriate to the Arizona climate and complementary 
to the cultural patterns of the community were aided. 
The workshops were to be open to general public par- 
ticipation and specifically aimed at assisting the 
Navajos in a community called Ganado. 

Arizona Commission on the Arts and Humanities 

6330 North Seventh Street 

Phoenix, AZ 85014 

Contact: Daniel P. Aiello, 516 West Parkway Boulevard, 

Tempe, AZ 85281, 602/967-7117 
$11,300 / FY 1975 

A series of Take Part Community Workshops developed by 
Lawrence Halprin and Associates was funded to involve 
as many citizens as possible in environmental design 
problems. The proposal was to develop a complete 
package and working prototype, and hold training work- 
shops for community leaders in conducting effective 
community meetings in the state's 400-plus cities. 

California Council of Product Design and Marketing 

1400 Tenth Street 

Sacramento, CA 95814 

Contact: William L. Perkins, Executive Director, 

916/445-1393 
$25,000 / FY 1975 

A series of three town meetings in California, held to 
discuss environmental and design problems and build 
public awareness of solutions and action needed, were 
funded. One was held in Sacramento — where a unique mul- 
tipurpose recreation facility of excellent design is 
threatened by conflicting claims on river use; and two 
were held in southern California where conflict exists 
over the use of the California desert. Materials devel- 
oped for the meetings were to be used as a continuing 
education resource. 

California Tomorrow 

681 Market Street, Room 1059 
San Francisco, CA 94105 

Contact: John W. Abbott, Executive Secretary and Editor, 

415/391-7544 
$27,660 / FY 1975 



32 



Coordination of the conference and publication on neigh- 
borhood conservation, held in New York City in September, 
1975, involved pre-conference planning and publication 
research. Also included under this contract was a com- 
parative analysis of international design centers and 
research on American professional design societies. 

Jane E. Clark 

20 32 Belmont Road, NW 

Washington, DC 20009 

$20,000 and $3,640 / FY 1975 and 1976 

New York City arrangements for the Neighborhood Conserva- 
tion Conference included design and preparation of the 
program, coordination of pre- and post-conference publi- 
cations and other materials, and liaison with public and 
private agencies in the New York area. 

Eugenie C. Cowan 

325 East 72nd Street 

New York, NY 10021 

$13,900 and $5,000 / FY 1975 and 1976 

A conference exploring pragmatic methods for conserving 
older neighborhoods of special urban character in the 
midst of planned development and change was held in New 
York City and brought together 300 leaders from varied 
fields — government, business, design, and social action. 
This grant partially supported consultants' fees, a re- 
source book, and research. 

Cultural Council Foundation 

1500 Broadway, 16th Floor 

New York, NY 10036 

Contact: Beverly Moss Spatt, Chairperson, Landmarks 

Preservation Fund, 212/566-7577 
$10,900 / FY 1975 

A regional conference on rehabilitation and conservation 
of urban neighborhoods was supported by this grant. A 
follow-up to the national conference on neighborhood pre- 
servation, the regional conference was to be designed to 
explore opportunities in Providence and other Rhode Is- 
land cities to help residents improve their neighborhoods 
and also retain the historic character of the buildings. 

City of Providence, RI 02903 

Contact: Antoinette Downing, Chairman, Rhode Island 
Historical Preservation Commission, Old State House, 
150 Benefit Street, Providence, RI 02903, 401/277-2678 

$9,000 / FY 1976 

Administration of the September 1975 Neighborhood Con- 
servation Conference expenses was funded. Such adminis- 
tration was to include disbursement of funds for pro- 
duction of the resource book, printing of materials for 
the conference, transcription of tapes, and payment of 
participants' expenses. 

Cultural Council Foundation 

1500 Broadway (16th Floor) 

New York, NY 10036 

Contact: Sara P. Garretson, Executive Director, 

212/869-3800 
$39,977 / FY 1976 



33 



A national conference on the revitalization of old 
courthouses, with production of an accompanying 
publication, was supported by this grant. 

National Trust for Historic Preservation 

1785 Massachusetts Avenue, NW 

Washington, DC 20036 

Contact: Mary C. Means, Regional Director, Midwest 
Office, Department of Field Services, 1800 South 
Prairie Avenue, Chicago, IL G0616, 312/842-0170 

$6,000 / FY 1976 

A workshop series to involve the public in environ- 
mental issues was funded. The workshops, led by local 
experts, were to be video-taped and used to increase 
the University's ability to disseminate information 
about the built environment to the communities in the 
area. 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 

University 
Greensboro, NC 27411 
Contact: Charles A. Fountain, Director, Environmental 

Planning and Natural Resources Institute, 919/379-7520 
$18,995 / FY 1976 

Support for regional and statewide meeting/workshops on 
neighborhood conservation, and the production of a hand- 
book/guide to assist local Maryland governments in the 
formulation of neighborhood preservation plans and pro- 
grams was given under this grant. These plans were re- 
quirements for municipalities applying for funds from 
the state's $10 million Housing Rehabilitation Program. 

State of Maryland Department of Economic and Community 

Development 
252 5 Riva Road 
Annapolis, MD 214 01 
Contact: Edward Symes, III, Director, Division of 

Local Development Assistance, 301/267-5838 
$12,000 / FY 1976 

Support for a conference emphasizing conservation of 
small town environments in Texas was funded. The aim 
of the two-day conference was to impress leaders of such 
communities with the need to preserve the desirable tra- 
ditional character of their local environments; and to 
give them legal, financial, and design resources for 
doing so. 

Texas Historical Commission 

P.O. Box 12276 

Capitol Station 

Austin, TX 78711 

Contact: Truett Latimer, Executive Director, 

512/475-3092 
$5,440 / FY 1976 

Through the establishment of a cooperative rehabilitation 
workshop in Old Ancostia, this project was to aid area 
residents in upgrading their homes at an affordable cost. 
The workshop served as an information clearinghouse on 
code requirements, design guidelines, and renovation 
methods, while facilitating cooperative ownership of 
tools and equipment. 

Washington Planning and Housing Association, Inc. 

1225 K Street, NW 

Washington, DC 20005 

Contact: Samuel J. Parker, Jr. 202/737-3700 

$19,940 / FY 1976 



34 



Multidisciplinary workshops in play environment education 
for a seven-county area of New York State were supported, 
Object of each 12-week workshop was for the workshop 
staff and volunteers to plan and execute a well-designed, 
permanent neighborhood play facility for the partici- 
pating community. 

Associated Colleges of the Mid-Hudson Area 

9 Vassar Street 

Poughkeepsie, NY 12601 

Contact: David Aaron, Director of Program Development, 

714/471-7477 
$7,500 / FY 1977 

A conference on Hispanic roots in the built environment 
of the South and Southwest, sponsored by the Vieux Carre 
Commission in New Orleans, was assisted. Grant funds 
were for speakers and expansion of the scope of the con- 
ference. 

City of New Orleans 

Vieux Carre Commission 

630 Chartres Street 

New Orleans, LA 70130 

Contact: Lynda C. Friedmann, Director, Vieux Carre 

Commission, 504/581-3510 
$17,000 / FY 1977 

A seminar on key issues raised by President Carter's 
proposal for a Heritage Trust program was held in 
September, 1978 under the sponsorship of the Con- 
servation Foundation in Washington, DC. 

The Conservation Foundation, Inc. 

1717 Massachusetts Avenue, NW 

Washington, DC 20036 

Contact: Phyllis Myers, Senior Associate, 202/ 

797-4348 
$5,000 / FY 1977 

Community seminars on good design were planned for 
Fort Wayne, Indiana, as a public awareness effort for 
planning the redevelopment of the downtown. 

Fort Wayne Fine Arts Foundation, Inc. 

114 East Superior Street 

Fort Wayne, IN 4 68 02 

Contact: John McKenna, Executive Director, 

219/424-0646 
$3,750 / FY 1977 

A conference on the "Prairie School" of architecture was 
held October 27-31, 1977, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, with 
assistance of this grant. Cosponsors of the conference, 
held in conjunction with a major exhibition, were the 
Milwaukee Art Center and the Northwestern Architectural 
Archives of the University of Minnesota. 

Milwaukee Art Center 
750 North Lincoln Memorial Drive 
Milwaukee, WI 5 3202 

Contact: Brian A. Spencer, AIA, Curator for Archi- 
tecture, 414/271-9508 
$7,000 / FY 1977 



38 



A conference on urban conservation — dealing with landlord, 
tenant and historic preservationist points of view — 
received funding support and was held November 3-5, 1977, 
in Savannah, Georgia. 

Savannah Landmark Rehabilitation Project, Inc. 

P.O. Box 8801 

Savannah, GA 31402 

Contact: Lloyd Veal, President, 912/232-6036 

$18,000 / FY 1977 

A public workshop "Alaska Urban Design II" dealing with 
Alaska's proposed new capital city was supported. 
Workshop participants were to review and make recommen- 
dations on design determinants that should be considered 
by the planners of the proposed new city, including 
such factors as climate, culture, psychological factors, 
and building techniques. Grant also supported publica- 
tion and distribution of the results of the meeting. 

State of Alaska 

Alaska Growth Policy Council 

429 D Street 

Suite 310 

Anchorage, AK 99501 

Contact: Robert Daugherty, Executive Director, Alaska 

Urban Design, 907/279-1558 
$20,000 / FY 1977 

A workshop on neighborhoods — with selected participants 
from communities in eight Midwestern states — was held 
June 6-7, 1978, in Lincoln, Nebraska. Project was in- 
tended to bring together midwestern groups working on 
similar projects to share their experiences in neigh- 
borhood preservation and revitalization and to use each 
other as information resources. Several experts in the 
field of neighborhood revitalization were on hand for 
technical assistance. 

Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, Inc. 

1735 New York Avenue, NW 

Washington, DC 20006 

Contact: Roger Schluntz, Executive Director.. 

202/785-2324 
$7,683 / FY 1978 

Workshops for Cape May, New Jersey, property owners were 
conducted on the design, technical, and legal aspects 
of preserving historic indigenous architecture. 

City of Cape May 

Cape May, NJ 08204 

Contact: Raymond E. Beyerlein, Project Director. 

609/884-8411 
$3,770 / FY 1978 



36 



The role of the arts in urban economic development was 
the focus of a national conference held October 4-7, 
1978, in Minneapolis. Conference workshops on arts 
districts, rehabilitation of older buildings for arts 
uses, new construction, city-sponsored cultural 
programming and the like were designed to help partic- 
ipants in understanding and approaching such projects 
for their communities. A workbook with case studies 
and extensive written material was developed for use 
at the conference. 

City of Minneapolis 

c/o Minneapolis Arts Commission 

302 City Hall 

Minneapolis, MN 55415 

Contact: Melisande Charles, Executive Director, 

Minneapolis Arts Commission, 612/348-5486 
$20,000 / FY 1978 

A touring lecture-exhibit program on Arcology — Paolo 
Soleri's concept of ecologically sound architecture 
in urban design — was assisted. The program would be 
"in residence" at host institutions for one-week 
periods to present information and provide a forum 
for discussion of urban design issues. 

Cosanti Foundation 

6433 Doubletree Road 

Scottsdale, AZ 85253 

Contact: Jeffrey Stein, Architectural Design/Research, 

602/948-6145 
$3,000 / FY 1978 

A lecture-tour on architecture and design — to be accom- 
panied by an exhibit, catalog, and slide shows — was 
supported to take place in 15 urban and rural centers 
across the United States. 

Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies 

8 West 40th Street 

New York, NY 10018 

Contact: Andrew MacNair, 212/398-9474 

$20,000 / FY 1978 

The design compatibility of old and new architecture was 
the theme of a national conference held in December 1977, 
by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Among 
the major issues explored by the 200 conferees: theoret- 
ical approaches used in old/new architectural design re- 
lationships and their relevance in practice; major prob- 
lems and benefits of design codes and ordinances; and the 
concepts of old and new architecture in the educational 
process for architects, planners, and others. Conference 
proceedings were to be published and distributed by the 
Trust. 

The National Trust for Historic Preservation 

1785 Massachusetts Avenue, NW 

Washington, DC 20036 

Contact: Russell Keune , Vice President for Preservation 

Services, 202/673-4100 
$15,000 / FY 1978 



37 



Training and other aspects of "Oklahoma Landscape" — a 
multi-part program to increase Oklahomans' awareness of 
their built environment — were assisted with this grant. 
A workshop in townscape processes was conducted for 
local professionals, and design consultants selected 
from the workshop group were contracted to work with 
three pilot communities for an eight-month period. 

Oklahoma City Arts Council, Inc. 

3014 Paseo 

Oklahoma City, OK 7 3103 

Contact: Harriet Moyer, Director, 405/525-0808 

$10,000 / FY 1978 

Technical expertise in historic preservation was made 
available to rural communities in the Southern Tier/ 
Finger Lakes region of New York. Grantee provided 
assistance in the identification, documentation and 
registration of historic buildings and districts; and 
held public programs on design. 

Regional Conference of Historical Agencies 

314 East Seneca Street 

Manlius, NY 13104 

Contact: Douglas S. Fischer, Director, 315/682-7088 

$15,000 / FY 1978 

Follow-up proceedings of an urban conservation conference 
held November 3-5, 1977, in Savannah, Georgia, were sup- 
ported with this grant. 

Savannah Landmark Rehabilitation Project, Inc. 

P.O. Box 8801 

Savannah, GA 31402 

Contact: Lloyd Veal, President, 912/232-6036 

$5,087 / FY 1978 

Seminars and informational materials on recycling vacant 
urban lands for recreational and open-space uses were 
funded as part of a comprehensive program to train 
community leaders in this process. 

The Trust for Public Land, Inc. 

82 Second Street 

San Francisco, CA 94105 

Contact: John E. Nelson, Director of Training, 

415/495-4014 
$15,000 / FY 1978 

A two-day conference on the Minnesota built environment 
was held in March 1978, with the goal of establishing 
a statewide network of groups interested and involved 
in livable cities. The statewide organization was to be 
modeled after the national Partners for Livable Places 
in Washington, D.C. 

University of Minnesota 

2642 University Avenue 

St. Paul, MN 55114 

Contact: William C. Rogers, Director, Continuing 

Education in Public Policy, 612/373-2709 
$14,540 / FY 1978 



38 



"The Livable Winter City" was the theme of two inter- 
national conferences held in 1978 and 1979 on enhance- 
ment of the design and livability of far northern cities 
in North America. Conferees from the United States, 
Canada, Great Britain, Scandinavia and the Soviet Union 
focused on three subject areas: the design and physical 
appearance of buildings in cold-weather environments, 
landscaping considerations, and human activities in 
winter cities including outdoor recreation and trans- 
portation needs. 

University of Minnesota 

264 2 University Avenue 

St. Paul, MN 55114 

Contact: William C. Rogers, Director, Continuing 

Education in Public Policy, 612/373-3709 
$7,710 / FY 1978 



Publications and Educational Materials 39 



The prototype for a series of state-by-state design 
guidebooks was produced. Rhode Island: A Guide to 
the Arts--the prototype guidebook — details through 
maps, photogrpahs, and text the state's "major attrac- 
tions in architecture, landscape design, urban design, 
fine and performing arts." 

Carl Feiss 

Urban and Regional Development Center 

University of Florida 

Gainesville, FL 32601 

$25,000 and $1,000 / FY 1967 and 1970 

Venturi's research on the Las Vegas Strip was organized 
for publication under this grant. Learning from Las 
Vegas was subsequently published by the MIT Press in 
November, 1973. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

77 Massachusetts Avenue 

Cambridge, MA 02139 

Contact: Robert Venturi, Venturi and Rauch, 333 South 

16th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102, 215/735-5079 
$2,000 / FY 1971 

A comprehensive analysis of new towns in the United 

States was funded. Resulting from this extensive 

study is a book entitled New Towns—Another Way to Live. 

Carlos Campbell 
11530 Links Drive 
Reston, VA 22090 
$12,000 / FY 1972 

To stimulate public interest in encouraging design 
excellence in public and private construction, the 
New York State Council on Architecture published 
"A Community Leader's Notebook" containing basic 
environmental design criteria and information on the 
design/construction process for community development 
groups and others concerned with urban design. 

New York State Council on Architecture 

810 Seventh Avenue 

New York, NY 10019 

Contact: Barbara Jo Schnepp, 212/765-7630 

$33,263 / FY 1972 

A handbook for community groups in the ghetto "described 
in an understandable way procedures for pursing posi- 
tive development projects. Cross references to agencies, 
technical and financial resources, programs and project 
development were included." The grant was administered 
by The Architects Workshop, a community design center 
supported under an earlier grant; and was matched, like 
the earler grant, in volunteered professional time. 

Philadelphia Architects Charitable Trust 
Architects Building, 117 South 17th Street 
Philadelphia, PA 19103 
Contact: Augustus Baxter, Executive Vice President, 

Architects Workshop, 401 North Broad Street, 

Philadelphia, PA 19108, 215/574-9591 
$10,000 / FY 1972 



40 



Thirty-five newspaper articles to heighten public design 
awareness were supported by this grant. The articles on 
environmental, architectural, and urban design topics 
appeared in the Austin American Statesman . 

James Sinclair Black 

University of Texas, School of Architecture 

Austin, TX 78712 

$5,000 / FY 1973 

A visual awareness program for an historic district of 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire, was designed to show new 
techniques for making history and architectural quality 
visible. "Visual labels" for a group of 1760-1810 
buildings identified significant features; and a tele- 
vision walking tour and a guide map for visitors were 
planned. 

Strawbery Banke, Inc. 

P.O. Box 300 

Portsmouth, NH 03801 

Contact: Edmund E. Lynch, Director, 603/436-8010 

$5,740 / FY 1973 

Preparation of the book Reusing Railroad Stations was 
funded. Resulting from a previously-funded study, the 
book inventoried the most important stations and sug- 
gested a wide variety of new uses and approaches. 

Educational Facilities Laboratories, Inc. 

680 5th Avenue 

New York, NY 10018 

Contact: Alan Green, President, 212/397-0037 

$23,000 / FY 1974 

A book on "places for celebration" in three American 
cities was financed. Photographs, text, and drawings 
suggest how spaces can be used as stage sets for various 
scales of celebration — with emphasis on presenting 
cities as our greatest expression of identity for the 
Bicentennial. 

J. P. Chadwick Floyd 
4200 49th Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20016 
$10,000 / FY 1974 

An environmental program for the Virginia Piedmont 
countryside was begun to create more public and govern- 
ment awareness and to identify and protect positive 
characteristics. Heavy emphasis was placed on devel- 
opment of legal means to implement controls on design 
and land use indicated by the study, and on developing 
education processes to foster citizen concern and to 
aid regional and local decision-makers. 

Piedmont Environmental Council 

28-C Main Street 

Warren ton, VA 22186 

Contact: W. P. Dinsmoor White, Executive Director, 

703/347-2334 
$41,000 / FY 1974 



41 



A book on the procedures used to recycle the Old Federal 
Courts Building in St. Paul, Minnesota, was intended to 
encourage similar efforts to save historic buildings. 
The book was to be distributed both locally and nation- 
ally to interested groups and organizations. 

Saint Paul Council of Arts and Sciences 

77 West Fifth Street 

St. Paul, MN 55102 

Contact: Joan Larsen Kelly, 612/224-2354 

$11,000 / FY 1974 

A book intended to foster awareness and pride in Hunting- 
don, Pennsylvania — especially its historic courthouse 
area — was published. By associating the area with 
people, periods, and activities significant in the city's 
history; and by describing the architecture in terms 
related to the total city character, the grantee hoped 
to supplement the present city plan, which focused 
solely on traffic conditions and retail areas. 

Nancy S. Shedd 
Rural Delivery 
Petersburg, PA 16669 
$9,720 / FY 1974 

Industrial design as a problem-solving activity in 
service of people was to be described in a book supported 
by this grant. Emphasis was on responsible manufac- 
turing, and the process of redesigning products or 
services that do not perform properly. The book was 
intended to be relevant to the needs of consumers as 
they use designed products, and to the problems of 
designers as they practice "a profession that has never 
been clearly defined." 

Ralph Caplan 

170 West End Avenue, Apartment 21A 

New York, NY 1002 3 

$10,000 / FY 1975 

All graphic materials for the Neighborhood Conservation 
Conference and design and mechanicals for a pre-confer- 
ence publication were prepared under this contract. 
Conference goals were the study of problems and conse- 
quences of conserving the character of urban communities, 
and evaluation of how historic district designations can 
be integrated into government preservation programs and 
policies . 

Ivan Chermayeff 

Chermayeff and Geismar Associates 

830 Third Avenue 

New York, NY 10017 

$13,500 and $8,225 / FY 1975 and 1976 

Documentation of "The Black Involvement in Architecture, 
1800-1974" was to be completed. Articles in profes- 
sional and popular magazines were planned, in addition 
to a final report and research bibliography. 

Richard K. Dozier 
2333 Fifth Avenue, #7DD 
New York, NY 10037 
$7,500 / FY 1975 



42 



A series of reports on facilities for the arts were 
researched and produced. Subjects covered included: 
exemplary multi-use art centers — especially those which 
lend themselves to duplication in similar settings around 
the country; innovative and experimental use of space for 
the visual arts in museums; "found facilities" for the 
arts—conversion and adaptive use of existing, under-used 
buildings; adaptation of railroad stations for multi-use 
renovation, with emphasis on the legal, economic, and 
technical problems involved; and joint development and 
use of facilities for education and arts. In addition to 
the reports, the contractor administered a program of 
on-site technical assistance for numerous groups. 

Educational Facilities Laboratories, Inc. 

68 5th Avenue 

New York, NY 10018 

Contact: Alan C. Green, President, 212/397-0037 

$160,000 / FY 1975 

Public awareness of the "development rights transfer" 
concept — under which landmarks and environmentally 
sensitive sites can be protected by transferring the 
rights to develop the threatened sites to other loca- 
tions where additional density poses no problems — was 
funded. The plan was to develop a graphics package to 
be used in future speeches and other presentations by 
the grantee. 

Environmental Action Foundation, Inc. 

1346 Connecticut Avenue, NW 

Washington, DC 20016 

Contact: Executive Director, 212/833-1845 

$10,000 / FY 1975 

Completion of a book of The Complete Architecture of 
Adler and Sullivan , left unfinished because of the death 
of its author — scholar and architectural photographer 
Richard Nickel — was funded. Two of Mr. Nickel's asso- 
ciates were selected to complete the text. 

Historic Pullman Foundation, Inc. 

614 East 113th Street 

Chicago, IL 60628 

Contact: John Vinci, 312/528-8814 

$10,000 / FY 1975 

A newspaper-magazine to serve as a forum for community 
action in Oak Lane — an older neighborhood — was estab- 
lished. The neighborhood — with many excellent old 
houses, and a good mix of social, economic, and racial 
groups — had a number of ongoing community programs, 
"some parallel, some conflicting." The goal was a 
communications system to try to coordinate the programs, 
and community goals and actions. 

Warren R. Infield 
1119 Oak Lane Avenue 
Philadelphia, PA 19126 
$10,000 / FY 1975 



43 



Production of two books on pedestrian use of cities was 
aided. The Rediscovery of the Pedestrian is a compara- 
tive analysis of selected American and European case 
studies; and Handbook for Pedestrian Action is a citizen 
guidebook directed to community planning boards, block 
associations, and concerned citizens. 

Institute for Environmental Action, Inc. 

81 Leonard Street 

New York, NY 10013 

Contact: Roberto Brambilla, 212/966-6390 

$10,000 and $23,000 / FY 1975 and 1976 

A photo essay and text on integration of new design 
into historic areas and/or other areas of special 
design control was prepared as part of the Endowment's 
contribution to the Design and Preservation Conference 
held in Warsaw, Poland, in October 1974. The essay 
has since been used for domestic conferences and 
programs . 

Norman H. Pfeiffer 

Hardy, Holzman, Pfeiffer Associates 

257 Park Avenue, South 

New York, NY 10010 

$4,000 / FY 1975 

To overcome apathy as an obstacle to preservation, this 
project explored various case histories where a broad 
base of public support was a major factor in success. 
A published booklet offers preservation groups solid 
guidelines for their own programs. 

Preservation League of New York State, Inc. 

130 Spring Street 

Rochester, NY 14608 

Contact: Kent Barwick, Vice President, 212/628-4553 

$4,050 / FY 1975 

Information derived from a study of energy/architecture 
alternatives to existing technology and construction 
methods was disseminated for public education. The 
report examined the "retrofitting" of a 104-year-old 
mill using both conventional and experimental means in 
an effort to inform the public about possible energy 
options for the future. 

Research and Design Institute 

P.O. Box 307 

Providence, RI 02901 

Contact: Ronald Beckman, 401/861-5390 

$15,000 / FY 1975 

A study of environmental problems in twenty to forty 
small towns in the United States was funded. Focus was 
on ways in which local residents assumed active roles 
in community rehabilitation, development, and planning. 
As a direct result of this research, The Small Towns 
Book was scheduled for publication by Doubleday /Anchor 
Books . 

James W. Robertson 
P.O. Box 156 
Covelo, CA 95428 
$10,000 / FY 1975 



44 



A pre-conference publication for the Neighborhood Con- 
servation Conference involved writing forty case studies 
of active and pertinent community conservation efforts, 
with field visits to the involved communities, and the 
bibliography for a full report to be edited and published 
by the Endowment. 

Harry Schwartz 

Abeles Schwartz and Associates 

10 Kenmare Street 

New York, NY 10012 

$17,500 / FY 1975 

A manual to assist landowners to manage, improve, or 
dispose of land — "in a way that realizes maximum benefits 
to both himself and his community" — was funded. The 
goal: "a sound appreciation of the responsibility and 
opportunity of land stewardship which is essential to 
the conservation of Maine's rural landscape." This grant 
was terminated without completion. 

State of Maine, Department of Conservation 

State House 

Augusta, ME 04 3 30 

Contact: Donaldson Koons , Commissioner, Department of 

Conservation, 207/289-2791 
$25,000 / FY 1975 

A manual for establishing community-educational programs 
in preservation was funded by this grant. The manual 
was to provide technical and management assistance to 
participating communities, and promote cooperation among 
community leaders. 

Architectural Heritage Foundation, Inc. 

4 5 School Street 

Boston, MA 02108 

Contact: Roger Webb, President, 617/523-8678 

$15,000 / FY 1976 

The preparation and distribution of an illustrated tech- 
nical restoration manual was supported by this grant 
with a special emphasis on the reinstitution of the com- 
munity's traditional building technologies. 

Bethel German Communal Colony, Inc. 
Bethel, MO 63434 

Contact: Rodney Robertson, 816/284-6207 
$13,330 / FY 1976 

Assisting communities in developing public environ- 
mental education and awareness projects was the focus 
of this grant. As a continuation and expansion of a 
previous grant in which "Urban Design Games" were 
developed for San Antonio, the grantee planned to adapt 
the game format to the urban planning issues of several 
United States cities. 

Anne S. Blocker 
LaMancha Group, Inc. 
SMU Box 945 
Dallas, TX 75275 
$8,000 / FY 1976 



48 



A community handbook of preservation guidelines for 
19th-century buildings in Philadelphia was planned. The 
handbook was to include a brief social and architectural 
history of structures in the Rittenhouse neighborhood, 
zoning and licensing procedures, and maintenance and 
restoration techniques. 

Center City Foundation, Inc. 

2027 Chestnut Street 

Philadelphia, PA 19103 

Contact: Bobbye Burke, Executive Director, 215/732-8271 

$12,500 / FY 1976 

Preparation of a guidebook on renovation of older resi- 
dential structures in Oakland, California, was supported 
under this grant. The manual was to offer "step-by-step 
guidance" to Oakland homeowners on residential rehabili- 
tation. 

City of Oakland, City Planning Department 

City Hall, 1421 Washington Street 

Oakland, CA 94612 

Contact: Cecil S. Riley, City Manager, 415/273-3301 

$10,000 / FY 1976 

To stimulate awareness and generate active participation 
by property owners in historic preservation, grant funds 
were to be used to support a publication describing the 
lost craft of building from the sioux quartzite indige- 
nous to the area of Pipestone, Minnesota. 

City of Pipestone 

217 South Hiawatha Avenue 

Pipestone, MN 56164 

Contact: David J. Albersman, 507/825-4333 

$500 / FY 1976 

A guidebook and kit for park development were to be 
prepared for national use and tested in the Dallas 
area. Emphasizing the needs of the people who do use 
and could use public parks, the catalog of do-it- 
yourself park improvements was to include materials, 
lists, construction details, and information on how to 
fund improvements and organize the community. 

Community Design Center of Dallas, Inc. 

SMU Box 94 5 

Dallas, TX 75275 

Contact: Anne Blocker, 214/691-7132 

$5,000 / FY 1976 

Development of a community preservation handbook to 
further New York City's public education program was 
funded. The handbook was to demonstrate how city 
agencies and resources could be used to enhance 
community preservation. 

Cultural Council Foundation 

1500 Broadway, 16th Floor 

New York, NY 10036 

Contact: Beverly Moss Spatt, Chairperson, Landmarks 

Preservation Commission, 212/566-7577 
$16,500 / FY 1976 



46 



Support for follow-up activities for the Neighborhood 
Conservation Conference held in 1975 was funded. Dis- 
tribution of workbooks, transcribing the proceedings of 
the 2^-day program, and development of the text and 
illustrations for reprinting of the proceedings were 
all to be accomplished under this grant. 

Cultural Council Foundation 

1500 Broadway, 16th Floor 

New York, NY 10036 

Contact: Eugenie Cowan, 212/988-0241 

$14,685 / FY 1976 

Development of a resource book on design and use of 
public school grounds was funded. 

Educational Futures, Inc. 

Built Environment Center 

2118 Spruce Street 

Philadelphia, PA 19103 

Contact: Aase Eriksen, Project Advisor, 215/735-2118 

$19, 850 / FY 1976 

Production of educational publications on neighborhood 
conservation in Washington, D.C., was the focus of this 
grant. A prototype leaflet for free distribution, a 
low-cost handbook, and a slide presentation of local areas 
to promote the preservation and enhancement of the phys- 
ical environment were scheduled. 

Don't Tear It Down 

1906 Sunderland Place, NW - Suite 402 

Washington, DC 20036 

Contact: Betts Abel, Executive Director, 202/223-1246 

$15,000 / FY 1976 

An information service on arts programs and facilities 
accessible to the handicapped was supported. Grant 
funds were to go for establishment and administration 
of this service. 

Educational Facilities Laboratories, Inc. 

68 5th Avenue 

New York, NY 10018 

Contact: Alan C. Green, President, 212/397-0037 

$121,140 / FY 1976 

The preparation of a catalog of guidebooks and guide 
materials dealing with the built environment was assisted 
by this grant. Subject areas were to include architec- 
ture, urban planning, historic preservation, landscape 
architecture, civil engineering, and industrial arche- 
ology. 

John Fondersmith 
1761 R Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20009 
$8,000 / FY 1976 

A source book on potential reuse of old movie theaters 
was to be prepared with funds from this grant. 

Robert E. Freeman 
435 West 119th Street, #71 
New York, NY 10027 
$10,000 / FY 1976 



47 



Research, publication, and distribution of a book des- 
cribing the "Treme" section of New Orleans were funded. 
This sixth volume of the New Orleans Architecture series 
was intended to serve as a handbook for restoration, to 
encourage neighborhood pride and act as a catalyst for 
civic activity, and to heighten awareness of the impor- 
tance of this black area's contribution to the develop- 
ment of New Orleans. 

Friends of the Cabildo 

701 Chartres Street 

New Orleans, LA 70116 

Contact: Mary Louise Christovich, 504/282-0215 

$10,000 / FY 1976 

Preparation of a catalog on little-known architecture of 
the Chicago School was funded to accompany the Council's 
exhibit on the same subject. 

Illinois Arts Council Foundation 

111 North Wabash, Suite 1610 

Chicago, IL 60602 

Contact: Stanley Tigerman, 312/793-3520 

$10,000 / FY 1976 

A report on the European study tour of American city 
officials, held in October 1975, was the focus of a 
special insert in Nation's Cities magazine funded under 
this grant. 

League of Cities — Conference of Mayors 

1620 Eye Street, NW 

Washington, DC 20006 

Contact: William Davis, Director, Office of Policy 

Analysis and Development, 202/293-7595 
$7,500 / FY 1976 

A grant to develop and expand interpretive programs on 
Washington architecture was awarded to Architour, Inc. 
Project included training of interpreters, preparation 
of pamphlets on Washington, D.C., and biweekly inter- 
pretive programs for area residents and visitors. 

Architour, Inc. 

1030 South Barton, #281 

Arlington, VA 22204 

Contact: Elizabeth H. Huffman, President, 202/223-2472 

$10,000 / FY 1977 

Guidelines for sympatheic renovation of housing stock 
were developed and distributed as pamphlets to Dorches- 
ter homeowners who were participating in technical and 
financial assistance programs offered by the Boston 
Neighborhood Housing Service. 

Boston Neighborhood Housing Service, Inc. 

35 Fernwood Road 

Boston, MA 02115 

Contact: David J. Salomon, Project Director, 

617/282-2900 
$7,000 / FY 1977 



48 



A survey of Cape May, New Jersey properties and a res- 
toration handbook for property owners were supported. 
Handbook was to assist both private and public owners of 
these late 19th-century frame buildings in selecting 
appropriate materials, paint colors, and detail finishes. 

City of Cape May 

Cape May, NJ 08204 

Contact: Carolyn Pitts, Architectural Historian, 

Historic Sites Survey, 201/523-5464 
$20,000 / FY 1977 

A design team to assist in the development and applica- 
tion of design controls for Cumberland, Maryland's 
downtown, and a Community Development neighborhood, 
was funded. The team also would orient local officials, 
sponsor workshops in conservation zones, and prepare a 
citizens' manual. 

City of Cumberland 

City Hall 

Cumberland, MD 21502 

Contact: George R. Scarlett, Director of Community 

Development, 301/722-2000, ext. 45 
$7,500 / FY 1977 

A design and public awareness program resulting in a 
workbook for use by other cities was undertaken in con- 
junction with a major corridor study in Evansville, 
Indiana. A team of design professionals was to explore 
new ideas for unifying amenities such as graphics, 
lighting, open spaces, and the blending of dissimilar 
land uses. 

City of Evansville 

City-County Administration Building 

Evansville, IN 47708 

Contact: Jeffrey L. Marston, Director, Department of 

Metropolitan Development, 812/426-5580 
$9,750 / FY 1977 

An architectural handbook for Madison, Indiana's historic 
district was prepared and distributed. The publication 
was to serve as a guide to preservation of the 133-block 
historic area. 

Historic Madison, Inc. 

500 West Street 

Madison, IN 47250 

Contact: Thomas Moriarty, Director, 812/265-2967 

$6,550 / FY 1977 

A publication on the State Capitol building of Minnesota 
was supported. Grant was for printing and free distribu- 
tion of 2,000 copies of schools, libraries, and other 
educational institutions in Minnesota. 

Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts 

133 East 25th Street 

Minneapolis, MN 55404 

Contact: Herb Grika, Project Director, 612/823-6361 

$5,000 / FY 1977 



49 



A study of vernacular design traditions of North Carolina 
was assisted. Results of the study were to be dissemi- 
nated to the public and design community. 

North Carolina State University 
Raleigh, NC 27607 

Contact: Dr. Shun Kanda, 419/737-2205 
$10,640 / FY 1977 

Instructional materials to assist environmental design 
activities in small communities were developed for 
packaging in self-contained learning kits. 

Planning Approaches for Community Environment, Inc. 

872 Massachusetts Avenue 

Cambridge, MA 02139 

Contact: Sheryl Handler, President, 617/876-5570 

$10,000 / FY 1977 

Research for a publication on design problems and solu- 
tions in small towns and rural areas was funded. Em- 
phasis of the project was on projects which contribute 
to a greater awareness of design principles in the 
natural and built environments. 

Small Towns Institute 

P.O. Box 517 

Ellensburg, WA 98926 

Contact: Anne S. Denman, Co-Director, 509/963-3221 

$10,300 / FY 1977 

A self-help handbook for improvement of stores, signs, 
and buildings on Main Street in Highland Falls was 
prepared under this grant. Handbook was to include 
recommendations for sources and methods of funding 
capital improvements. 

Village of Highland Falls 

180 Main Street 

Highland Falls, NY 10928 

Contact: John E. Bourke, Project Director, 914/446-3400 

$17,000 / FY 1977 

A handbook entitled "Community Action for Corporate 
Design Change" received funding to support editing, 
design, layout, photography, and promotion efforts. 

Vision, Inc. 

678 Massachusetts Avenue, Suite 601 

Cambridge, MA 02139 

Contact: Michael Robinson, Director of Urban Design, 

617/491-3763 
$5,000 / FY 1977 

Research and preparation of a guidebook showing the 
importance of preservation and enhancement of the visual 
environment to community revitalization were supported. 

Vision, Inc. 

678 Massachusetts Avenue, Suite 601 

Cambridge, MA 02139 

Contact: Michael Robinson, Director of Urban Design, 

617/491-3763 
$29,590 / FY 1977 



80 



Research for a four-month series — "Reviving Our Cities" — 
in Region magazine was assisted. Series was to focus on 
improving the quality of life in urban centers of the 
Delaware Valley, including Philadelphia, Trenton, and 
Camden . 

Delaware Valley Regional Information Corporation 

20th Floor, Three Parkway 

Philadelphia, PA 19102 

Contact: Theresa A. Crown, Editor, 215/563-3313 

$26,445 / FY 1978 

Research on the architecture of Centerville, Indiana, 
was conducted and published 1) to improve local public 
awareness of preservation and 2) to establish a preserva- 
tion plan and guidelines for restoration of buildings in 
the historic district. 

Historic Centerville, Inc. 

P.O. Box 7 3 

Centerville, IN 47330 

Contact: Patrick H. Steele, Preservation Coordinator, 

317/478-4550 
$10,000 / FY 1978 

A citywide sign system — identifying ethnic-group achieve- 
ments and sites in the varied neighborhoods of Salem, 
Massachusetts — was intended to give residents "a sense 
of historical connection between themselves and their 
environment. " 

Historic Salem, Inc. 

P.O. Box 865 

Salem, MA 01970 

Contact: Robert A. Booth, Jr., Director of Research, 

617/744-8804 
$9,775 / FY 1978 

A series of booklets, Learning From. . . , was prepared 
with this grant. The series documented innovative uses 
of Federal dollars in solving urban design/planning 
problems. The four thematic booklets included: 
creative use of found spaces; waterfront development 
options; design-oriented city ordinances and guidelines; 
and enhancement of central business districts. 

Institute for Environmental Action, Inc. 

81 Leonard Street 

New York, NY 10013 

Contact: Roberto Brambilla, 212/260-6278 

$17,500 / FY 1978 

Phase two of the National Trust's "Main Street Project" — 
a practical handbook for conservation of central business 
districts — was supported with this grant for research and 
publication costs. 

National Trust for Historic Preservation 

1785 Massachusetts Avenue, NW 

Washington, DC 20036 

Contact: Susan Garber, Midwest Regional Office, 

312/341-1930 
$26,425 / FY 1978 



81 



Establishment of the Livability Clearinghouse, an infor- 
mation-sharing service of the Partners for Livable 
Places, was carried out under this cooperative agreement 
with the Design Arts Program (formerly called Architec- 
ture, Planning and Design Program) . The Clearinghouse 
operates a centralized information center with a comput- 
erized data base on projects assisted by the Design Arts 
Program; a repository of reports and other printed 
information on the built environment, environmental arts 
and livability; and as a place to promote and disseminate 
the results of selected projects. 

Partners for Livable Places 
2120 P Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20037 
$100,000 / FY 1978 

A Whole Preservation Catalogue was researched and written 
as a sourcebook of ideas, materials and funding sources 
for active preservationists. 

National Trust for Historic Preservation 

1785 Massachusetts Avenue, NW 

Washington, DC 20036 

Contact: Terry B. Morton, Vice President, Preservation 

Press, 202/673-4100 
$10,000 / FY 1978 

A homeowners' preservation manual for Cleveland's Near 
West Side was prepared, with guidelines on how to main- 
tain the historic character of buildings in home renova- 
tion. 

Neighborhood Housing Services of Cleveland 

4415 Bridge Avenue 

Cleveland, OH 44113 

Contact: Herald H. Meyer, Director, 216/961-2096 

$5,000 / FY 1978 

A Guide to New York City Open Spaces was researched and 
produced with this grant. Included in the guide were 
listings of parks, plazas, streets, playgrounds and other 
open spaces and suggested walking tours of selected 
areas. Two mobile exhibits for outdoor display were 
developed to highlight less well-known spaces in Man- 
hattan and other boroughs . 

Research Foundation of the City University of New York 

Convert Avenue at 138th Street 

New York, NY 10031 

Contact: Paul M. Friedberg, Director, Urban Landscape 

Program, City College of New York, 212/247-8480 
$24,020 / FY 1978 

A publication on Saratoga County, New York's historic 
sites and structures was prepared to increase local 
public awareness of the area's architectural heritage 
and the benefits of preservation. 

Saratoga County Board of Supervisors 

Municipal Center 

Ballston Spa, NY 12020 

Contact: Janette Johnstone, Cultural Resources Planner, 

518/885-5381, ext. 205 
$4,100 / FY 1978 



58 



A booklet with case studies of eight varied communities 
received funding support. The publication was to serve 
as a guide to suggested and proven strategies for apply- 
ing the design disciplines and the leverage of small 
Federal grants to make communities more livable. 

Nancy Sisk 

1022 Wilson Boulevard 
Arlington, VA 22209 
$9,611 / FY 1978 



Multi-media Projects 83 



A program to publicize and encourage use of Boston's 
"Urban Wild" — its hilltops, shorelines, wetlands, and 
historic open spaces — was developed. Phase One, to be 
implemented for the Bicentennial, was a citywide traveling 
exhibition and guide of these spaces and guidebook to 
walking and bike tours of these historic and scenic 
locations. 

Boston Redevelopment Authority 

City Hall, Room 900 

2 City Hall Square 

Boston, MA 02201 

Contact: Elliot Rhodeside, 703/836-1414 

$50,000 / FY 1974 

An effort to raise the pride and consciousness of Roxbury 
citizens was funded. Roxbury was explained in present 
and historic terms through walking and cycling tours, 
re-orientation exhibits, and guidebooks and leaflets. 
From this introduction, neighborhood task forces examined 
internal development possibilities. The goal was to 
give the residents a "strong sense of place — not just in 
space but in time." 

Museum of Afro-American History 

Box 322, Smith Court 

Boston, MA 02114 

Contact: Byron Rushing, President, 617/723-8863 

$50,000 / FY 1974 

Building of public support for historic preservation in 
Santa Cruz, California, was accomplished by film and 
slide presentations, a tourist guide to local Victorian 
buildings, citywide distribution of an existing Historic 
Preservation Plan, and a community forum on city design 
for historic and developing areas. 

City of Santa Cruz 

809 Center Street 

Santa Cruz, CA 95060 

Contact: Phillip W. Jones, Planning Director, 

408/426-5000 
$9,900 / FY 1975 

An expansion of preservation efforts in Savannah 
included several parts: publication of an expanded 
historic survey, photographic exhibits to show neigh- 
borhood design qualities, and a slide lecture series. 
This program enlarged a very successful Landmark 
District conservation program into other well planned 
but deteriorating urban neighborhoods. 

Historic Savannah Foundation, Inc. 

P.O. Box 1733 

Contact: Decourcy E. Mcintosh, Executive Director 

$15,000 / FY 1975 



84 



An education program on conservation/adaptive use for 
local town officials, citizens, design professionals and 
students was developed — including lectures, studio/work- 
shops, and publication of information on a variety of 
sites and techniques used in Boston. The program in- 
volved professionals, lawyers, developers, and architects 
as guest lecturers. 

President and Fellows of Harvard University 

1350 Massachusetts Avenue 

Cambridge, MA 02138 

Contact: William D. Giezentanner , 617/495-3560 

$17,000 / FY 1975 

A seminar series and publication on the visual image of 
small towns in Mississippi were supported by this grant. 
The seminars were planned to involve leaders and citizens 
of small towns throughout the state, and to focus on 
visual image as an expression of the economic base and 
social characteristics of the community. The product 
of the seminars was to be an illustrated publication 
documenting common problems and recommended improvements. 

James F. Barker 

School of Architecture, Drawer AQ 
Mississippi State University 
State College, MS 39762 
$10,000 / FY 1976 

Documentation of a self-help environmental awareness 
program in Boston was funded. The project was to include 
slide tapes, a photo essay manual, and a film of the 
city's Victory Garden Program to encourage community 
cooperation. 

Christian A. Herter Center, Inc. 

1175 Soldiers Field Road 

Allston, MA 02134 

Contact: David E. Wood, 617/783-0609 

$5,000 / FY 1976 

A public awareness program on creating community identity 
through vegetation planning was funded. An informative 
brochure, a slide presentation, and how-to-do-it materi- 
als were to be prepared and disseminated. 

City of Upper Arlington 

3600 Tremont Road 

Upper Arlington, OH 43221 

Contact: Hal W. Hyrne, City Manager, 614/457-5080 

$3,625 / FY 1976 

A public education program promoting community conserva- 
tion in Albany, New York, was funded. The program was 
to involve preparation of walking tours; historical and 
educational markers; transfer of a videotape, "Cityscape: 
An Urbane Future for Albany," to 16mm film; and a promo- 
tional slide program on the Capitol Hill historic area 
as an inner-city residential neighborhood. 

Historic Albany Foundation, Inc. 

194 Elm Street 

Albany, NY 12202 

Contact: Louise McAllister Merritt, Director, 

518/463-0622 
$6,000 / FY 1976 



88 



A statewide project entitled "Illinois Architecture: A 
Revolution on the Prairie" was funded to celebrate the 
Unique contribution of Illinois to the history of Amer- 
ican architecture. The project was to be comprised of 
several components including an information and tour 
center, exhibitions, films, and a mobile exhibit/educa- 
tional unit. 

Illinois Arts Council 

111 North Wabash Avenue, Room 1610 

Chicago, IL 60602 

Contact: Michele Brustin, Executive Director, 

312/793-3520 
$35,000 / FY 1976 

A public awareness program on visual environmental 
issues of Lafayette, Louisiana, was funded under this 
grant. The program was to consist of a film series on 
architecture, a photographic competition and exhibition 
on rural-urban relationships, and various symposia and 
lectures involving the participation of outstanding 
artists and designers. 

Lafayette Natural History Museum and Planetarium 

Association, Inc. 
637 Girard Park Drive 
Lafayette, LA 70501 

Contact: Neil Martin Nehrbass, 318/234-2347 
$10,000 / FY 1976 

Public awareness of the historical significance of an 
old church in Washington, D.C., was to be accomplished 
through intensive research and video-taped interviews 
with senior members of the congregation. A booklet and 
portable exhibit were to be produced in order to "at- 
tract public support to complete the overall historical 
and adaptive restoration" of this landmark building. 

Metropolitan A. M. E. Church 

1518 M Street, NW 

Washington, DC 20005 

Contact: Reverend Robert L. Pruitt, Minister, 

202/347-3426 
$10,000 / FY 1976 

The documentation of five neighborhood economic revital- 
ization projects dealing with design questions related 
to community and commercial areas was funded. A 15- 
minute filmstrip and outline handbook were to be prepared 
to stimulate interest and involvement in other, cities. 

National Center for Urban Ethnic Affairs 

4408 8th Street, NE 

Washington, DC 20017 

Contact: Roberta Corletta, 202/529-5400 

$18,620 / FY 1976 

To increase public awareness and involvement in the reuse 
of Main Street in Ogden, Utah, was the focus of this 
project. An audio-visual presentation and brochure were 
planned. 

Ogden City Corporation 

Department of Community Development 

2650 Washington Boulevard 

Ogden, UT 84401 

Contact: Richard L. Larsen, City Manager, 801/399-8011 

$5,910 / FY 1976 



86 



Preservation of the historical resources of the Rio 
Grande Valley was funded through development of four 
public communication devices. A publication, slide-tape 
show, traveling exhibition, and reference files were 
planned to show the "legacy of the Spanish colonial era" 
in this region. 

State of Texas 

Office of the Governor 

Austin, TX 78701 

Contact: Truett Latimer, Executive Director, Texas 

Historical Commission, P.O. Box 12276, Capitol Station, 

Austin, TX 78711, 512/475-3092 
$10,000 / FY 1976 

Preparation of townscape conservation advocacy and 
design awareness information, and guide material was 
planned for distribution throughout New England. 
Slides, tape shows, teacher kits, and a townscape 
manual were to be prepared. 

Vision, Inc. 

678 Massachusetts Avenue, Suite 601 

Cambridge, MA 02139 

Contact: Joyce Meschan, 617/491-3763 

$10,000 / FY 1976 

A public awareness program consisting of case studies, 
a workshop, and catalog on the potential use of abandoned 
and underused church properties in New York City was 
supported. The program emphasized the role of religious 
institutions in neighborhood preservation. 

The Cheswick Center 

17 Dunster Street 

Cambridge, MA 02138 

Contact: W. Seavy Joyce, S.J., Project Director, 

617/491-4432 
$12,500 / FY 1977 

Support for program development at ArchiCenter included 
preparation of an historical exhibition on Chicago 
architecture, special tours, slide presentations, and 
walking tours for children. ArchiCenter programs and 
activities focus on Chicago's contributions to world 
architecture. 

Chicago School of Architecture Foundation 

1800 South Prairie Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60616 

Contact: Victoria Matranga, Director, 312/782-1776 

$10,000 / FY 1977 

A demonstration project involving facade improvements 
for Court Street in Brooklyn's Cobble Hill Historic 
District was the focus of this grant. Assistance for 
planning, design, publication and exhibition costs was 
given to the Landmarks Preservation Commission and the 
Housing and Development Administration. 

Cultural Council Foundation 

1500 Broadway, 16th Floor 

New York, NY 10036 

Contact: Beverly Moss Spatt, Chairperson, Landmarks 

Preservation Commission, 212/566-7577 
$13,965 / FY 1977 



87 



A nationwide survey of urban centers — documenting the 
importance of scale in the design of cities — was funded. 
Grantee was to synthesize the findings in a book and 
16mm film. 

Institute for Environmental Action 

81 Leonard Street 

New York, NY 10013 

Contact: Roberto Brambilla, 212/260-6278 

$20,000 / FY 1977 

Development of creative alternatives for eliminating 
visual blight at key sites in New York City was sup- 
ported. Grantee proposed to devise "low cost design 
solutions that can make a dramatic improvement" and to 
utilize them in a program of broad public education, 
including a "before/during/after" slide show, exhibit 
materials, a poster and brochure. 

Municipal Art Society 

457 Madison Avenue 

New York, NY 10022 

Contact: Bronson Binger, Vice President, 212/935-3960 

$10,000 / FY 1977 

The services of a professional designer to coordinate 
implementation of Phase Two of "Design Michigan" were 
funded. The designer's responsibilities were to include 
development of a juried design exhibition to tour the 
State. 

Michigan Council for the Arts 
1200 Sixth Avenue 
Detroit, MI 48226 

Contact: James A Crawford, Environmental Arts Coor- 
dinator, 313/256-3731 
$10,000 / FY 1977 

Phase Two of "Design Michigan" — a statewide design aware- 
ness and improvement program with broad public partic- 
ipation — was supported. This phase of the program was 
to include 15 small design assemblies around the State, 
distribution of educational posters, preparation of a 
slide show, and buyers' guides in architecture, interior 
and graphic design, and planning. 

Michigan Council for the Arts 
1200 Sixth Avenue 
Detroit, MI 48226 

Contact: James A. Crawford, Environmental Arts Coor- 
dinator, 313/256-3731 
$10,000 / FY 1977 

Documentation of Pittsburgh's adaptive reuse activities 
in a book, exhibition, and slide show was funded. Pro- 
ject was intended to increase awareness of the esthetic 
and economic benefits of reinvestment in old downtown 
buildings; and was aimed at an audience of corporate, 
commercial, real estate and financial leaders. 

Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation 

The Old Post Office - Allegheny Square West 

Pittsburgh, PA 15212 

Contact: Arthur P. Ziegler, Jr., President, 412/322-1204 

$14,450 / FY 1977 



58 



A film and report on the function and design of public 
office building plazas were funded. Grantee prepared 
case studies of several plazas — including the Federal 
Office Building plaza in Seattle — to make recommendations 
on the uses and design of public open spaces. 

Project for Public Spaces, Inc. 
875 Avenue of the Americas 
New York, NY 10 001 
Contact: Fred Kent, Director, 

212/564-2906 
$5,000 / FY 1977 

A program to advance public interest in preserving the 
rural landscape was developed by the Iowa Division of 
Historic Preservation. Assistance was for preparation 
of illustrated materials, development of a course, and 
a conference. 

State of Iowa, Division of Historic Preservation 

26 East Market Street 

Iowa City, IA 52240 

Contact: Adrian D. Anderson, Director, Iowa State 

Historical Department, 319/353-4186 
$16,765 / FY 1977 

A design information clearinghouse was to be established 
in downtown Manchester, New Hampshire. Grantee proposed 
use of a variety of educational materials — including 
slide shows, handouts, public transit advertising, and 
walking tours — to develop citizen awareness of and input 
into proposed renovation plans for the city. 

Federated Arts of Manchester, Inc. 

Box 36 

Manchester, NH 03105 

Contact: Dolly Harrison, Executive Director, 

603/668-6186 
$30,000 / FY 1978 

To enhance historic preservation and design of downtown 
Albuquerque, New Mexico, grantee developed learning 
materials and program — preservation brochures, slide 
lecture presentations, and practical preservation work- 
shops — and contracted for design assistance to rehabil- 
itate specific structures. 

Neighborhood Housing Services of Albuquerque, Inc. 

920 Lomas Boulevard, NW 

Albuquerque, NM 87102 

Contact: Hugh J. Graham, Jr., President, 505/243-5511 

$10,000 / FY 1978 

Development of handbooks and a seminar for New York 
theater groups — on building code requirements, licenses 
and alternative spaces — was funded by this grant. 

Off -Off Broadway Alliance, Inc. 

162 West 56th Street 

New York, NY 10019 

Contact: Ellen B. Rudolph, Executive Director, 

212/757-4473 
$22,900 / FY 1978 



Design Awareness in the Schools 

Programs for Teachers 



The environmental education of public school teachers 
was encouraged by "catalyst" fellowships given to 
graduate students and faculty of ACSA-member schools. 
Under the ACSA Environmental Experience Stipends pro- 
gram, thirty-one grantees taught courses to some 600 
teachers in various parts of the United States. A 
conference to evaluate completed and prepared work was 
held. The final report summarized the conference and 
activities conducted by the grantee. 

Boston Architectural Center 

320 Newbury Street 

Boston, MA 02115 

Contact: David Clarke, Executive Director, Association 
of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, Inc., 1735 
New York Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20006, 
202/785-7300 

$25,000 / FY 1972 

The environmental education of public school teachers 
was continued by "catalyst" fellowships given to 
graduate students and faculty of ACSA-member schools. 

Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, Inc. 

1735 New York Avenue, NW 

Washington, DC 20006 

Contact: David Clarke, Executive Director, 202/785-7300 

$25,000 / FY 1973 

Regional pilot programs in environmental education for 
teachers and administrators in North and South Dakota 
public school were developed. 

North Dakota State University 
Fargo, ND 58102 

Contact: Ronald Lanier Ramsey, Department of Archi- 
tecture, 701/237-8614 
$9,990 / FY 1973 

A program focusing on awareness and understanding of 
"city edges" was supported. The multidisciplinary 
educational effort included an audio-visual presen- 
tation, a summer seminar for elementary and secondary 
teachers, and a study of city edges by school and 
community groups . 

Portland Public Schools Areas I and III 

1221 SE Madison Street 

Portland, OR 97214 

Contact: Roberta Caughlan, Portland Public Schools 
Area III, Eco-Aesthetics Center, Duniway School, 
7700 SE Reed College Place, Portland, OR 97202, 
503/771-3126 

$6,090 / FY 1973 



60 



A three-year summer "awareness" institute for kinder- 
garten teachers was intended to stimulate teachers to 
give students a sensitivity to and creative attitude 
toward the urban environment. The program consisted 
of a month of lectures, audio-visual instruction and 
work sessions in July, with follow-up workshops in 
January and March. First year program on architecture, 
a second year on urban planning, and the third year 
on metropolitan regional planning was projected. 

Chicago School of Architecture Foundation 

1800 South Prairie Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60616 

Contact: John Craib-Cox, Curator, Education Director, 

312/326-1393 
$17,888 / FY 1974 

A continuation of the "awareness" institute for teachers 
was planned. This second program was on "seeing 
buildings in context with others," and was taught in 
the summer with follow-up workshops . Forty teachers 
were involved, with a potential of reaching thousands 
of students over the years. 

Chicago School of Architecture Foundation 

1800 South Prairie Avenue 

Chicago, IL 60616 

Contact: John Craib-Cox, Curator, Education Director, 

312/326-1393 
$20,000 / FY 1975 

Materials and programs on learning about the built 
environment were to be incorporated into a major 
information network available to teachers and design 
professionals. Funds helped maintain an office to 
facilitate information flow, service requests for help, 
continue collection of materials, and form a national 
membership. 

Educational Futures, Inc. 

2118 Spruce Street 

Philadelphia, PA 19103 

Contact: Aase Eriksen, Director, 215/735-2118 

$14,725 / FY 1975 

Expansion of an existing program for primary/secondary 
teachers in environmental awareness was aided; with 
workshops for teachers, development of teaching materi- 
als, publication of a monthly newsletter, and formula- 
tion of plans for extending the scope of the project 
beyond the schools to include more of the general public 

North Dakota State University 

Fargo, ND 58102 

Contact: Cecil D. Elliott, Chairman, Department of 

Architecture, 701/237-8614 
$8,960 / FY 1975 

Workshops for teachers on the spatial needs of children 
and basic design were expanded. New demonstration areas 
at the Center show methods of affecting color, lighting, 
and equipment in classroom settings; and a program of 
visitation to trained teachers — who in turn show other 
teachers the design techniques — was enlarged. 

The Teacher Center, Inc. 

425 College Street 

New Haven, CT 06511 

Contact: Corinne Levin, Coordinator, 203/776-5987 

$12,500 / FY 1975 



Elementary and Secondary Education ei 

An environmental awareness project aimed at high school 
students, and named Environmental Awareness Language, 
was begun with the production of two short (ten minute) 
films illustrating human reactions to specific charac- 
teristics of the environment — solitude, perception, 
exploration, time and communication. 

Christopher B. Bedford 
1015 18th Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20036 
$10,000 / FY 1972 

An educational gaming project, for children in grades 4 
through 6, was intended to teach various subjects — 
including social and physical sciences, mathematics, 
and the arts — through the context of city planninq. 
The task of the game was the design and building of a 
scale-model city. This alternate teaching method was 
offered in a number of area schools, attracted con- 
siderable public notice, and a teacher workshop was held. 

Los Angeles Unified School District 

4 50 North Grand Avenue 

Los Angeles, CA 90012 

Contact: Doreen Nelson, Director, City Building Educa- 
tional Program, Sulphur Springs District Office, 
18830 Soledad Canyon Road, Saugus, CA 91351 

$30,325 / FY 1972 

A classroom textbook on environmental concerns was based 
on a comprehensive program of environmental education 
developed for The Group for Environmental Education 
(GEE). The book, intended for eighth-graders, focused 
on "the critical process of effectuating environmental 
change." This project received substantial support from 
private foundations, and The Process of Choice was 
readied for publication by the MIT Press in Fall, 1973. 

Philadelphia Architects Charitable Trust 

Architects Building, 117 South 17th Street 

Philadelphia, PA 19103 

Contact: Alan Levy, President, Group for Environmental 

Education, Inc., 1214 Arch Street, Philadelphia, PA 

19107, 215/564-4400 
$12,500 / FY 1972 

A film-discussion program conducted with high school 
audiences in Alabama was intended to focus on and create 
awareness of local environmental programs. Grantee's 
film "Catfish and Neon Signs" — produced under an earlier 
grant — was used, and discussions followed on identifying 
good and bad elements in the environment and encouraging 
personal involvement in their solution. 

Auburn University 

School of Architecture and Fine Arts 

Auburn, AL 36830 

Contact: Steffen Doerstling, Professor of Architecture, 

205/826-4516 
$3,789 / FY 1974 



68 



A program under which children produced their own shows 
on urban life was tested in a number of Richmond, 
Virginia schools. Grantee had designed an audio-visual 
system simple enough for children to create their own 
color slide presentations. The best of the presentations 
developed were to be transmitted over the educational 
television network. 

Ed Bedno 

8 505 Academy Road 
Richmond, VA 2 3229 
$9,800 / FY 1974 

Architecture and design were taught at a Providence 
high school under this grant. The program was staffed 
by a Rhode Island School of Design student, supervised 
by RISD faculty and the head of the Hope High School 
art department. Curriculum was a series of design 
problems, such as redesigning an area of the school, 
designing an ideal room, designing a personal logo. 
As a term project, each student identified an ineffec- 
tively used building or site in his or her neighborhood 
and proposed to its owner how it might be improved. 

Richard E. Polton 
Rhode Island School of Design 
Box 636, 2 College Street 
Providence, RI 02903 
$2,875 / FY 1974 

Secondary education in "the political process affecting 
environment" was instituted under this grant as part of 
a larger, ongoing, multidisciplinary public-school 
program called "Eco-Aesthetics . " The program included 
examination of issues, site inspections, mini-courses, 
small-group development, and summer seminars. 

Portland Public Schools, Area III 

1221 SE Madison Street 

Portland, OR 97214 

Contact: Roberta J. Caughlan, Project Manager, Portland 
Public Schools, Area III, Eco-Aesthetics Center, 
Duniway School, 7700 SE Reed College Place, Portland, 
OR 97202, 503/771-3126 

$9,748 / FY 1974 

A film and video program on the city environment for 
secondary school in Fayette County, Kentucky, was 
developed. Design and planning concepts were introduced 
through films on such topics as the energy crisis, inner 
city rehabilitation, "What is a neighborhood?" and 
"Streets for cars or people?" The curriculum developed 
was to be carried on by participative high school 
teachers beyond the original four-school effort. 

University of Kentucky Research Foundation 

Lexington, KY 40506 

Contact: S. B. Edwins, College of Architecture, 

606/258-5736 
$11,780 / FY 1974 



63 



A study of how children experience their neighborhood 
was intended to build environmental awareness at the 
elementary school level, while "enabling them to expand 
their own neighborhood options and perceptions." 
Interviews, observations, and "guided tours" were con- 
ducted with children at two public schools in differing 
neighborhoods of New York City. 

Frederick B. Wheeler, Jr. 
591 Sixth Street, #2 
Brooklyn, NY 11215 
$8,300 / FY 1974 

A program of public-school teaching by volunteer archi- 
tects, involving field trips and follow-up discussion, 
writing, drawing, or model-making, was supported. The 
School Committee helped finance the project which now 
reaches over 1,000 students per year. 

Boston Society of Architects Charitable Foundation 

320 Newbury Street 

Boston, MA 02115 

Contact: George Zimberg, Administrative Director, 

Urban Awareness and Environmental Understanding 

Program, 617/267-5175 
$12,500 / FY 1975 

An environmental learning project for grades 3-6 in 
Los Angeles' Hoover Street School was planned. The 
students were educated in community awareness through 
observation, criticism, studying and revising class- 
room designs, community exploration, and visits to 
cities for study of the environment at a larger scale. 

Henry Custis 
241 Marine Street 
Santa Monica, CA 90405 
$10,000 / FY 1975 

An awareness program for sixty fifth- and sixth-graders 
per week from schools in Maryland, Pennsylvania, and 
the District of Columbia was aided. Echo Hill Outdoor 
School had a 16-week fall and spring program under which 
visiting students explored historic structures, and 
learned to identify and study historically and architec- 
turally significant structures in their own neighbor- 
hoods. Students also learned to prepare suggestions to 
their home town officials. 

Echo Hill Outdoor School, Inc. 

Worton, MD 21678 

Contact: Peter R. Rice, Jr., Director, 301/348-5303 

$7,280 / FY 1975 

Environmental education materials for children were 
designed, developed, and distributed under this grant. 
Entitle "The Senses Packet," the materials create inter- 
disciplinary learning experiences for children by in- 
volving them in interaction with their own environment. 

Carole Ann Rollins 
2155 Powell Street 
San Francisco, CA 94133 
$10,000 / FY 1975 



64 



Urban discovery and community improvement activities for 
children were supported under this grant. The project 
was to be carried out as part of the educational program 
at the High Museum of Art, and was to employ high school 
students trained especially for the project. 

Atlanta Arts Alliance, Inc. 

1280 Peachtree Street, NE 

Atlanta, GA 30309 

Contact: Paula Hancock, Curator of Education, High 

Museum of Art, 1280 Peachtree Street, NE, Atlanta, GA 

30309, 404/892-3600 
$7,500 / FY 1976 

The development of a technique for international communi- 
cation among children about their understanding of the 
built environment was funded by this grant. Slide shows 
were to be prepared by children of several countries. 

Ed Bedno 

8505 Academy Road 
Richmond, VA 2 3229 
$9,200 / FY 1976 

A monthly newsletter for elementary schools, concerned 
with environmental and design issues, was supported by 
this grant. Each issue was to have two sections, one 
for students in grades 3-6, and an accompanying one for 
parents and teachers. The newsletter was to be distrib- 
uted to subscribers in North and South Dakota, Montana, 
and adjacent areas of Minnesota. 

North Dakota State University 

Department of Architecture 

Fargo, ND 58102 

Contact: Cecil D. Elliot, Chairman, 701/237-8614 

$8,740 / FY 1976 

Experimental classes in environmental design for children 
in the school systems of Pennsylvania were planned. 
These classes were to serve as the basis for a children's 
book on the built environment. 

Nancy W. Renfro 
74 3 First Avenue 
Berwyn, PA 19312 
$10,000 / FY 1976 

An environmental awareness program for junior high 
school students in Lawrence, Kansas, was funded. The 
project was to expand their consciousness of the effects 
of major architectural and spatial elements in the 
environment. 

University of Kansas 

Lawrence, KS 66045 

Contact: Dolores Brooking, Curator of Museum Education, 

University of Kansas Museum of Art, 913/864-4710 
$2,968 / FY 1976 



68 



Workshops and materials for an environmental education 
program with citywide participation by students and 
teachers were supported. Students designed thematic 
walking tours of their school neighborhoods and produced 
annotated maps for the walks. The program was adminis- 
tered by the Council on the Environment of New York City. 

Administration and Management Research Corporation of 

New York City, Inc. 
Contact: Michael Zamm, Project Director, Council on the 

Environment of New York City, 51 Chambers Street, Room 

228, New York, NY 10007, 212/566-0990 
$12,220 / FY 1977 

Documentation and evaluation of the architecture/environ- 
mental arts component of the Artists-in-Schools Program 
were carried out with this grant. The program places 
architects and landscape architects in short-term 
residencies in elementary and secondary schools to 
develop projects and learning materials on the built 
environment. 

Educational Futures, Inc. 

2118 Spruce Street 

Philadelphia, PA 19103 

Contact: Dr. Aase Eriksen, Director, 

215/735-2118 
$32,100 / FY 1977 

An urban design education program for the Providence, 
Rhode Island, school system was supported. Project 
included a catalog of urban design resources to be 
distributed to teachers, and activities focused on the 
discovery, communication, and improvement of physical 
resources in students' neighborhoods. 

Providence School Department 

150 Washington Street 

Providence, RI 02903 

Contact: Johnette Isham, Project Director, 

401/272-4900, ext. 206 
$16,985 / FY 1977 

Documentation and evaluation of the architectural/ 
environmental arts component of the Artists-in-Schools 
Program were continued for a second year with this 
grant. 

Educational Futures, Inc. 

2118 Spruce St 

Philadelphia, PA 19103 

Contact: Dr. Aase Eriksen, Director, 

215/735-2118 
$22,060 / FY 1978 



Postsecondary Education 



A program of public education and awareness — based on 
the influences of technology, food production, energy 
and transportation systems, social institutions, and 
recreation activities on the physical fabric of our 
lives — was funded. Phase One involved developing 
materials for college students. Phase Two was planned 
to develop formats for public education and primary- 
and secondary-school teaching. 



Louis J. Bakanowsky 
2 Barberry Road 
Lexington, MA 02173 
$10,000 / FY 1975 



College level training in urban design for community 
leaders involved five one-week workshops over a year's 
period. Ten "community fellows." chosen for local 
involvement and commitment to remaining in the community, 
with emphasis on minority people from small developing 
communities, studied under college faculty. They were 
carried as special students, non-degree; and remained 
employed. Workshops were chosen and timed to relate to 
specific problems in the Fellow's home community. 

Texas A & M University 

College Station, TX 77843 

Contact: Jesus H. Hinojosa, Department of Urban and 

Regional Planning, 713/845-1046 
$22,769 / FY 1974 

A one-year environmental design program assisted by this 
grant was intended for design students, practicing 
professionals, and the general public. The project's 
goals: to increase the proficiency of professional and 
preprofessional environmental designers; generate new 
information and design concepts for the region; and 
increase public awareness of design. 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University 

Greensboro, NC 27411 

Contact: C. A. Fountain, 919/379-7520 

$15,000 / FY 1978 

Learning materials for "The Campus Course" — a program to 
introduce environmental design to a wide spectrum of 
students and community members in the San Francisco Bay 
area — were developed with this grant. Materials were 
based on the concept "that college and university cam- 
puses are designed environments, and that they are avail- 
able for use as experiential learning laboratories 
through "personalized, self-paced and self-guided 
instructional materials." 

University of California-Berkeley 

M-ll Wheeler Hall 

Berkeley, CA 94720 

Contact: Roger Montgomery, Professor of Architecture 

and City Planning, 415/642-0832 
$22,890 / FY 1978 



Index 67 



pg Alabama 

Auburn University 
14 10,000/72 
61 3,789/74 



Alaska 

State of Alaska 
35 20,000/77 



Arizona 

Arizona Commission on the Arts and Humanities 
31 11,300/75 

Cosanti Foundation 

36 3,000/78 

California 

California Council on the Arts and Humanities 
31 25,000/75 

California Historical Society Trust 
16 15,000/74 

California Tomorrow 
31 27,660/75 

City of Oakland 
45 10,000/76 

City of Santa Cruz 
53 9,900/75 

Henry Custis 
63 10,000/75 

Allan B. Jacobs 
15 10,000/73 

Los Angeles Unified School District 
61 30,325/72 

Public Interest Advertising Council 
19 35,000/75 

James W. Robertson 
43 10,000/75 

Carole Ann Rollins 
63 10,000/75 

Roger Sherwood 
25 1,200/73 

Jack W. Stauffacher 

21 8,000/76 

The Trust for Public Land 

22 3,400/76 

37 15,000/78 

University of California-Berkeley 
66 22,890/78 

Connecticut 

The Connecticut Trust for Historic Preservation, Inc, 
11 20,000/76 

The Teacher Center, Inc. 
60 12,500/75 



68 

District of Columbia 

American Design Bicentennial, Inc. 
16 40,000/74 

American Institute of Architects Foundation, Inc. 

26 110,000/76 

Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, Inc. 
59 25,000/73 
55 7,683/78 

Christopher B. Bedford 
61 10,000/72 

Jane E. Clark 
32 20,000/75 

32 3,640/76 

The Conservation Foundation, Inc. 
18 50,000/75 
34 5,000/77 

Don't Tear It Down 
46 15,000/76 

The Dunlap Society, Inc. 
28 13,614/77 

Environmental Action Foundation, Inc. 
42 10,000/75 

10 17,500/75 

John Fondersmith 

46 8,000/76 

J. P. Chadwick Floyd 
40 10,000/74 

League of Cities — Conference of Mayors 

47 7,500/76 

11 17,000/76 

Metropolitan A. M. E. Church 
55 10,000/76 

National Center for Urban Ethnic Affairs 
55 18,620/76 

The National Council for Urban Economic Development 

11 17,000/77 

National Trust for Historic Preservation 

33 6,000/76 

12 37,070/77 
51 10,000/78 
36 15,000/78 

50 26,425/78 

Partners for Livable Places 

51 100,000/78 
12 150,000/78 

Joseph R. Passonneau 
23 17,500/78 

Smithsonian Institution 

27 15,000/76 

Society for Industrial Archeology 
15 9,000/73 
21 4,984/76 

University of the District of Columbia 
12 17,500/77 

Washington Planning and Housing Association, Inc. 
33 19,940/76 

Florida 

Arts Assembly of Jacksonville, Inc. 
11 3,000/77 

Carl Feiss 
39 25,000/67 
39 1,000/70 



69 



Georgia 

Atlanta Arts Alliance, Inc. 
64 7,500/76 

Historic Savannah Foundation, Inc. 
53 15,000/75 

Savannah Landmark Rehabilitation Project, Inc. 
35 18,000/77 
37 5,087 

WETV/Atlanta Board of Education 
23 29,145/78 

Hawaii 

Hawaii State Foundation on Culture and the Arts 

18 20,000/75 

Illinois 

Chicago School of Architecture Foundation 
60 17,888/74 
60 20,000/75 
56 10,000/77 

Historic Pullman Foundation, Inc. 
42 10,000/75 

Illinois Arts Council 
55 35,000/76 
12 5,115/78 

Illinois Arts Council Foundation 

47 10,000/76 

Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago 

19 6,000/75 

Indiana 

Ball State University 
14 13,435/72 

City of Evansville 

48 9,750/77 

Fort Wayne Fine Arts Foundation, Inc. 
34 3,750/77 

Historic Centerville, Inc. 
50 10,000/78 

Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana, Inc. 

20 6,150/76 

Historic Madison, Inc. 
48 6,550/77 

Iowa 

State of Iowa 
58 16,765/77 

Kansas 

University of Kansas 
64 2,968/76 

Kentucky 

University of Kentucky Research Foundation 
62 11,780/74 

Louisiana 

City of New Orleans 



34 


17,000/77 




Virgil E. Ford, Jr. 


16 


250/74 




Friends of the Cabildo 


47 


10,000/76 




Lafayette Natural History Museum and Planetarium 




Association, Inc. 


55 


10,000/76 




David Richmond 


21 


8,200/76 




Henry V. Stout 


9 


7,000/74 



70 



Maine 

State of Maine Department of Conservation 
44 25,000/75 

Maryland 

City of Baltimore 

26 2,371/75 

City of Cumberland 

48 7,500/77 

Echo Hill Outdoor School, Inc. 
63 7,280/75 

State of Maryland Department of Economic and 
Community Development 
33 12,000/76 

Massachusetts 

Architectural Heritage Foundation, Inc. 
44 15,000/76 

Louis J. Bakanowsky 
66 10,000/75 

Boston Architectural Center 
59 25,000/72 

Boston Neighborhood Housing Service, Inc. 
47 7,000/77 

Boston Redevelopment Authority 

53 50,000/74 

Boston Society of Architects Charitable Foundation 
63 12,500/75 

The Cheswick Center 
56 12,500/77 

The Children's Museum 

27 10,000/76 

Christian A. Herter Center, Inc. 

54 5,000/76 

Ralph W. Clampitt 
16 10,000/74 

Todd A. Gipstein 
20 10,000/76 

Historic Salem, Inc. 
50 9,775/78 

Hoosuck Community Resources Corporation 
18 20,000/75 

Randolph Langenbach 

27 10,000/76 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
7 30,000/74 
39 2,000/71 

Museum of Afro-American History 

53 50,000/74 

28 10,000/77 

Planning Approaches for Community Environment, Inc. 

49 10,000/77 

President and Fellows of Harvard University 

54 17,000/75 
Albert Viator 

22 8,000/76 

Vision, Inc. 
15 28,940/73 
56 10 ,000/76 
49 5,000/77 
49 29,590/77 



71 



Michigan 

Michigan Council for the Arts 
57 10,000/77 
57 10,000/77 



Minnesota 

City of Minneapolis 

36 20,000/78 

City of Pipestone 
45 500/76 

Minneapolis Society of Fine Arts 
48 5,000/77 

Minnesota Pioneer Travel Park 
19 3,000/75 

Saint Paul Council of Arts and Sciences 
41 11,000/74 

University of Minnesota 
38 7,710/78 

37 14,540/78 

Walker Art Center, Inc. 
7 22,500/72 



Mississippi 

James F. Barker 
54 10,000/76 



Missouri 

Bethel German Communal Colony, Inc. 
44 13,330/76 



New Hampshire 

Federated Arts of Manchester, Inc. 
58 30,000/78 

Strawberry Banke, Inc. 
40 5,740/73 



New Jersey 

City of Cape May 
48 20,000/77 
35 3,770/78 

City of Paterson 
27 19,750/77 

Community Design and Research Corporation 
9 30,000/74 

Tocks Island Regional Advisory Council 
30 10,000/67 

New Mexico 

Neighborhood Housing Services of Albuquerque 
58 10,000/78 

New York 

Administration and Management Research Corporation 
of New York City, Inc. 
65 12,220/77 

American Institute of Architects Foundation, Inc. 
New York Chapter 
23 28,600/78 

American Institute of Graphic Arts 
29 7,500/78 

American Society of Interior Desiqner Educational 
Foundation, Inc. 
29 12,500/78 

Architectural League of New York 
25 10,000/74 



78 



Associated Colleges of the Mid-Hudson Area 
34 7,500/77 

Basement Workshop, Inc. 

30 9,700/74 

James M. Bond, Jr. 

16 10,000/74 
Ralph Caplan 

41 10,000/75 

Ivan Chermayeff 
41 13,500/75 
41 8,225/76 

Eugenie C. Cowan 
32 13,900/75 
32 5,000/76 

Cultural Council Foundation 
32 10,900/75 
9 19,000/75 
36 14,685/76 

45 16,500/76 
32 39,977/76 

56 13,965/77 

Downtown Brooklyn Development Association, Inc. 

9 18,000/75 
Richard K. Dozier 

41 7,500/75 

The Drawing Center 
28 10,000/77 

Educational Facilities Laboratories, Inc. 

31 17,000/74 
40 23,000/74 

42 160,000/75 

46 121,140/76 

Elaine Summers Experimental Intermedia Foundation, Inc. 

10 10,000/75 
Robert E. Freeman 

46 10,000/76 

Greater Cornwall Association, Inc. 

17 24,662/74 
Hilary T. Harris 

15 10,000/73 
John Hedjuk 

25 5,000/72 

Historic Albany Foundation, Inc. 
54 6,000/76 

Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies 
36 20,000/78 

The Institute for Art and Urban Resources 
28 20,000/77 

Institute for Environmental Action, Inc. 

26 15,000/74 

43 10,000/75 
43 23,000/76 

57 20,000/77 
23 5,000/78 
50 17,500/78 

Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Inc. 
23 30,000/78 

Jon Wing Lum 
17 9,600/74 
20 9,800/76 

Municipal Art Society 
57 10,000/77 

11 12,500/77 

The Museum of Modern Art 
28 15,000/77 

George Nelson 
19 12,000/75 



73 



New York State Council on Architecture 
14 9,989/72 
39 33,263/72 
8 40,000/73 
8 30,000/74 

19th Ward Community Association 
29 8,700/77 

Off -Off Broadway Alliance, Inc. 
58 22,900/78 

Norman H. Pfeiffer 
43 4,000/75 

Preservation League of New York State, Inc. 

43 4,050/75 

Project for Public Spaces, Inc. 

58 5,000/77 

Queens Council on the Arts 

7 10,000/72 

8 20,000/73 

Regional Conference of Historical Agencies 
37 15,000/78 

Research Foundation of the City University of New York 
51 24,020/78 

Saratoga County Board of Supervisors 
51 4,100/78 

Harry Schwartz 

44 17,500 
Edgar Tafel 

26 8,850/75 

The Trustees of Columbia University 
18 15,000/74 
20 10,000/75 
13 15,000/78 

Village of Highland Falls 
49 17,000/77 

Frederick B. Wheeler, Jr. 

63 8,300/74 

North Dakota 

North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State 
University 
33 18,995/76 
66 15,000/78 

North Carolina State University 
49 10,640/77 

George H. Van Allen 
22 8,854/76 

North. Carolina 

North Dakota State University 

59 9,990/73 

60 8,060/75 

64 8,740/76 

Ohio 

City of Upper Arlington 
56 3,625/76 

Cleveland Area Arts Council 
10 5,000/76 

Neighborhood Housing Services of Cleveland 
51 5,000/78 

Ohio Arts Council 
8 5,000/73 
8 8,500/74 

Rapid Recovery, Inc. 
13 10,000/78 



74 



Oklahoma 

City of Guthrie 
30 20,000/74 

Oklahoma City Arts Council, Inc. 
37 10,000/78 



Oregon 

Portland Public Schools Areas I and III 

59 6,090/73 

Portland Public Schools Area III 
62 9,748/74 

Pennsylvania 

Center City Foundation, Inc. 

45 12,500/76 

Delaware Valley Regional Information Corporation 
50 26,445/78 

Educational Futures, Inc. 

60 14,725/75 

46 19,850/76 
65 32,100/77 
12 15,810/78 
65 22,060/78 

Warren R. Infield 

42 10,000/75 

Philadelphia Architects Charitable Trust 
7 10,000/71 

39 10,000/72 

61 12,500/72 
21 10,000/76 

Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation 
10 29,336/75 
57 14,450/77 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 
25 10,000/70 

Nancy W. Renfro 

64 10,000/76 
Nancy S. Shedd 

41 9,720/74 

South Central Educational Broadcasting Council 
17 30,000/74 

City of Providence 
32 9,000/76 

Richard E. Polton 

62 2,875/74 

Providence School Department 

65 16,985/77 

Research and Design Institute 

43 15,000/75 

Tennessee 

Brooks Memorial Art Gallery 
29 2,930/78 

Ibxas 

James Sinclair Black 

40 5,000/73 

Ann S. Blocker 

44 8,000/76 

Community Design Center of Dallas, Inc. 

45 5,000/76 

Contemporary Art Association of Houston 
25 10,000/73 

Public Communications Foundation for North Texas 
17 15,542/74 

Public Television Foundation for North Texas 
15 15,000/72 



78 



State of Texas 

10,000/76 

Texas A & M University 

22,769/74 

Texas Historical Commission 

5,440/76 



Utah 

Ogden City Corporation 
55 5,910/76 



Vermont 

Park-McCullough House Association, Inc. 
27 6,000/76 

Vermont Council on the Arts, Inc. 

13 14,000/78 

Virginia 

Architour, Inc. 
47 10,000/77 

Ed Bedno 
62 9,800/74 
64 9,200/76 

Carlos Campbell 

39 12,000/72 

Piedmont Environmental Council 

40 41,000/74 

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 
24 5,000/78 

Nancy Sisk 
52 9,611/78 

Washington 

Allied Arts Foundation 
22 8,800/78 

City of Seattle 
26 10,000/75 

Roger T. Hagan 

14 20,313/72 
14 5,000/74 

Small Towns Institute 
49 10,300/77 

Wisconsin 

Historic Walker's Point, Inc. 
22 950/77 

Milwaukee Art Center 
34 7,000/77